Testing Methodology

In the previous pages you might have seen a Matrix oscilloscope sitting on top of the SunMoon load tester. Not only has the CompuNurse been upgraded, but the O-scope has been upgraded as well.

I wanted something that would allow me to capture o-scope readings so I could add them to my reviews.

JG Testing Methodology

Above is my newest toy: The USB-Instruments Stingray DS1M12 2+1 channel PC digital oscilloscope. This $220, palm-sized device actually replaces the $1000 desktop oscilloscope.

The BNC cable from the Waveform Monitor output of the load tester goes to the Stingray. The Stingray interfaces with a PC with a USB cable. The data is displayed on the PC either via Easy Logger or EasyScope II.

JG Testing Methodology

Above is a screenshot of the DataLogger program.

JG Testing Methodology

The photo above shows how easy it is to change the value of X axis.

JG Testing Methodology

Above shows how the Y axis values and scale are changed.

JG Testing Methodology

EasyScope II puts all of the necessary controls on one screen. The above shot shows an interface that is very similar to a real-life, single channel oscilloscope. For the second channel, one simply clicks on the “Channel B” tab.

JG Testing Methodology

Setting up persistence can help log changes over a long period of time as a more solid line.

JG Testing Methodology

The FFT display was fun to work with. I never did figure out how to lock the maximum mV reading, but then again I haven’t read the manual yet. 😉

Above, the FFT display is shown with a magnitude spectrum.

JG Testing Methodology

Here the FFT display is displaying a phase spectrum.

JG Testing Methodology

EasyScope even allows the user to view results with an analog output.

Overall, I think I might have a pretty good testing methodology in place. Now I’m not only able to test PSU’s at a higher temperature without cranking up the heat in the house, but also capture how “clean” rail output is.