Reviews - Antec High Current Pro 1200W
Sample Provided by: Antec (By jonny on Tue, Sep-07-2010)

Page 2 -

All testing is done using an SM-8800 active load tester in a 20°C room. Artificial static loads are placed on each rail, then voltages and total wattage is recorded. The loads represent a +5VSB only load, 10%, 20%, 35%, 50%, 65%, 80% and 100% as well as two cross-loads: High +12V and high +3.3V & +5V. The amount of wattage being pulled from the wall is also recorded and efficiency calculated. I also record the power factor of the unit. This particular unit has no -5V rail and we do not load test the rarely used -12V rail, so there are no results for those two rails.

Temperatures are measured at both the intake fan and exhaust grill of the PSU.

Antec HCP1200 COLD load tests

Test #

+3.3V

+5V

+12V

+5VSB

DC Watts/
AC Watts

Eff.

Power
Factor

Intake/
Exhaust

Simulated system load tests

Test
0

0A

0A

0A

2A

10W/
12.2W

82%

.59

18°C/
18°C

     

5.03V

Test
1

0A

0A

0A

2A

10W/
32.8W
30.5%
.73
18°C/
18°C

3.33V

5.07V

12.21V

5.03V

Test
2

1.5A

2A

8A

2A

122.4W/
151.5W

80.8%

.94

18°C/
20°C

3.32V

5.06V

12.21V

5.02V

Test
3

2.5A

6A

16A

2A

243.3W/
274.1W

88.8%

.97

19°C/
22°C

3.31V

5.04V

12.20V

5.01V

Test
4

7A

10A

28A

2A

424W/
471.8W

90.1%

.98

20°C/
25°C

3.29V

5.03V

12.20V

4.99V

Test
5

12A

14A

40A

2A

605.6W/
672.3W

90.1%

.99

20°C/
30°C

3.27V

5.01V

12.20V

4.97V

Test
6

17A

18A

52A

2A

786.6W/
875.5W

89.8%

.99

20°C/
28°C

3.25V

4.99V

12.20V

4.96V

Test
7

20A

22A

64.5A

2A

978.7W/
1101W

88.9%

.99

19°C/
27°C

3.23V

4.97V

12.20V

4.94V

Test
8

20A

21A

85A

2A

1206.5W/
1381W

87.4%

.99

19°C/
26°C

3.22V

4.96V

12.20V

4.93V

Test
CL1

21A

21A

2A

0A

198.9W/
239.3W

83.1%

.96

20°C/
28°C

3.29V

5.03V

12.21V

5.04V

Test
CL2

0A

0A

99A

0A

1203W/
1360W

88.5%

.98

19°C/
27°C

3.26V

4.99V

12.24V

4.99V

You'll note that I've added a "test 0". I did this because "test 1" is somewhat unrealistic: it has a load on only the +5VSB while the PSU is on. "Test 0" has the PSU off with the same load on it, exhibiting what it would be like with your computer "off", but a number of USB devices plugged into it. Here we see a fairly decent efficiency of 82%, but a poor power factor of .59. During "test 1", we see very poor efficiency because we're energizing the entire primary circuit of the power supply, but only the +5VSB circuit is doing any AC to DC conversion.

Other than this test, we actually see some phenomenal efficiency. 80 Plus Gold certification is given to power supplies that are 87% or better efficiency at 20% and 100% loads, and 90% efficiency at 50% load. So on our table, we want to have a look at the efficiency column during test 3, 5 and 8. Here we see 88.8%, 90.1% and 87.4%. Clearly, the PSU nails the 80 Plus Gold certification with ease.

Now moving through the gauntlet of tests 2 through 8, which represents 10% to 100% loads, we see that the +12V hardly waivers at all. The +3.3V and +5V, on the other hand, use DC to DC VRM's to regulate +12V into their respective voltages. Using this type of setting up does yield better efficiency, but we sometimes sacrifice tight regulation. Our +3.3V dropped .11V, or 3.3%. Our +5V also dropped .11V, or 2.2%. This is quite a drop, but still within specification. Compared to the Corsair AX1200, which also uses DC to DC for the non-primary rails; the AX-1200's 3.3V dropped only 2.4% and the +5V dropped only 1.2% when loads on these rails were pushed to 20A each.

During most of the tests, the 80mm fan was surprisingly quiet. But during test 7 the fan did kick into overdrive emitting a high pitched whir that is indicative of an 80mm fan. We can actually see the effect the higher RPM's of the fan had on the thermal delta because the intake temperature actually dropped one degree during test 7. This, of course, is because the fan was drawing more outside air into the power supply. I didn't let the noise bother me, though. Fact of the matter is, if you're kicking almost 1000W of power, your computer's GPU fans or CPU fans are probably making a heck of a lot more noise than the PSU's fan!

Crossload tests show us nothing unusual, despite these kinds of loads being very unrealistic in today's PC's.

Now let's have a look at the ripple of this power supply. Ripple is the small variations in the DC voltage that was not successfully filtered from the AC coming into the power supply. We want as little ripple as possible coming from the power supply, because any ripple that the power supply doesn't clean up, the components that the power supply is feeding power to will need to suppress.

Let's see what the oscilloscope has to show us...

 

Oscilloscope Measurements for Antec HCP1200

 

Test #

 

+3.3V

 

+5V

 

+12V

 

+5VSB

 

Test 1
(+5VSB Only)

 

 


 


 


 

Test 2

 

 


 


 


 

Test 3

 

 


 


 


 

Test 4

 

 


 


 


 

Test 5

 

 


 


 


 

Test 6

 

 


 


 


 

Test 7

 

 


 


 


 

Test 8

 

 


 


 


 

Test 9
(CL 1)

 

 


 


 


Test 10
(CL2)

 

 


 


 


Now, we usually do our o-scope measurements with a V/Div of 50mV. What the means is that for every horizontal line on the screen shot is 50mV of ripple. So if the waveform goes from one line to another, point to point, you're looking at 50mV. As you can see from the screen shots above, there's virtually no ripple regardless of the load. The waveform barely even leaves the center line. So what I've done here is turned the V/Div up to 10mV and ran test 8 a second time. Here are those results:

Test 8
@10mV

 

 

 

 

So even when we zoom into a 10mV V/Div, we can still see that the ripple is hardly even 15mV on any of the rails. Job well done.

That all said and done, let's take the heat from our load and pump it into the power supply's intake. This puts a worst case scenario twist on a fairly realistic environment. When your PSU powers your components, your components exhaust unused energy as heat. What makes this test worst case scenario is that your chassis has many ways for heat to escape; including the power supply's fan. In our test, virtually all the heat escapes via the power supply.

Once again, temperatures are measured at the intake and the exhaust. Here we want to see a low delta between the two temperatures because that means the power supply is doing it's job at exhausting heat from itself, as well as from the chassis. It's illogical to think that a higher temperature means the power supply is creating more heat. The heat created by a power supply is the AC power not being converted directly into DC, so only a much less efficient power supply would actually run hotter.

Now for the hot load tests:

Antec HCP1200 HOT load tests

Test #

+3.3V

+5V

+12V

+5VSB

DC Watts/
AC Watts

Eff.

Power
Factor

Intake/
Exhaust

Simulated system load tests

Test
1

0A

0A

0A

2A

10W/
32.8W
30.5%
.73
26°C/
28°C

3.33V

5.07V

12.21V

5.03V

Test
2

1.5A

2A

8A

2A

122.4W/
151.0W

81%

.94

26°C/
29°C

3.32V

5.06V

12.21V

5.02V

Test
3

2.5A

6A

16A

2A

243.4W/
273.5W

89%

.97

28°C/
31°C

3.31V

5.05V

12.20V

5.01V

Test
4

7A

10A

28A

2A

424.1W/
472.2W

89.8%

.98

31°C/
35°C

3.29V

5.03V

12.20V

4.99V

Test
5

12A

14A

40A

2A

605.5W/
673.1W

90%

.99

32°C/
37°C

3.27V

5.01V

12.20V

4.97V

Test
6

17A

18A

52A

2A

786.2W/
877.9W

89.6%

.99

35°C/
40°C

3.25V

4.99V

12.20V

4.95V

Test
7

20A

22A

64.5A

2A

977.8W/
1108W

88.2%

.99

36°C/
40°C

3.23V

4.97V

12.19V

4.94V

Test
8

20A

21A

85A

2A

1207.3W/
1382W

87.4%

.98

36°C/
43°C

3.21V

4.96V

12.19V

4.92V

Test
CL1

21A

21A

2A

0A

198.7W/
238.6W

83.3%

.97

35°C/
39°C

3.28V

5.03V

12.20V

5.04V

Test
CL2

0A

0A

99A

0A

1200.4W/
1363W

88.1%

.98

36°C/
43°C

3.25V

4.99V

12.22V

4.98V

As far as voltages, total wattage, efficiency, etc., there is little change when the PSU is fed hot air. This time, the fan kicked into high gear during test 6, as opposed to test 7, and actually kicked into an even higher speed during test 7 that wasn't heard at all during the cold tests. Again, the PSU is pushing out a lot of power at this point. Odds are that you're doing something with the PC where the noise from the PSU fan isn't going to be the loudest noise coming from the computer.

Another thing I decided to do was test the OCP on the unit. Antec claims that the OCP for each of the eight +12V rails is set to 30A. OCP is important, because SCP (short circuit protection) and OPP (over power protection) may not kick in until some time after a short occurs because when a short occurs, wires add resistance to the circuit that allow them to act as fuses. Antec is heavily marketing the fact that they have OCP on their +12V rails... almost as much as PC Power & Cooling marketed single +12V rails as being a positive because they couldn't figure out how to properly divide loads across multiple rails and/or failed to realize that they could add more +12V rails to their units. I proceeded to put a 30A load on one connector, the 8-pin CPU connector, and turn the juice up until the PSU shut down. Typically, I'll see a PSU shut off at 10% over whatever the OCP is set to, but on the HCP 1200, I had the load on the 8-pin cranked up to the maximum I'm able to put on a single connector, 40.98A, and the PSU never shut down.

That's not to say the HCP 1200 doesn't have an OCP on each +12V rail. Almost all of us have seen the videos that Antec has posted showing their PSU shutting down when shorted, where others would light motherboards on fire when shorted, but the OCP certainly isn't set to 30A per rail... or 40A for that matter.

Now let's take the PSU apart and see what it looks like inside....



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