Reviews - Silverstone Zeus ZU1200M 1200W
Sample Provided by: SilverStone (By OklahomaWolf on Mon, Jul-07-2008)

Page 1 -

Good morning, fellow power supply fanatics. Once again, yours truly has a victim to torture in one of Silverstone's newest additions to the Zeus line, the ZU1200M. Many of you may or not be aware that an older Zeus offering, the Etasis sourced ST56ZF, once took up the prized spot of glory in my own computer. So, I was admittedly anxious to take Silverstone up on the chance to see how the newer Zeus models fared now that they have moved away from Etasis as a supplier to Impervio.

I love that name by the way, Impervio... I wonder if the company was founded by a superhero. Or perhaps an 1800's magician. Let's get right to the action, and see if that magician was known as Impervio the Magnificent or Impervio the Disappointing, shall we?

Once again, a box picture starts us off. It's not a terribly large box for a unit of this capacity, but it does brag about some cool features I thought I would mention. Efficiency greater than 80%. Nice. Japanese capacitors. Nice. Adjustable switch for six or single 12V operation. I question the necessity of such a feature, as most of the time it won't matter what you set it to, but... nice anyway. Up in the corner, a small box promises us six 6 pin PCI-E connectors so we can have a three way video card set up. This reviewer wonders if three of them can be made into 8 pin PCI-E connectors so we can use more powerful cards with the unit. We'll find that out later on.

1200W continuous power rated up to 50 degrees. Very nice. Although, I've come to expect such specs from these Zeus models. My hot box will get to the bottom of that claim later on.

Over on another side of the box, we get a bit more info on the unit inside, including a load table for sextuple 12V rail mode. I was wondering when I'd finally write up one of these and be able to use the word "sextuple" in a sentence. Good that it tells me the unit is black - I couldn't possibly have guessed that from the pictures. Single 80mm fan... that could get noisy.

The back of the box features a big exploded picture of the guts of the unit, and a whole pile of bragging points about its construction. Since the above pic is too small to read these, my fingers are headed for some extra typing. Here they are, going from top to bottom, starting with the left side. My wise guy comments appear in italics:

  • D/D module of 5V and 3.3V for better load regulation 4 pieces extracted aluminum heat sink, improving cooling performance
  • High precision OCP sensing resistor - these shunts are common with multiple 12V designs
  • High reliability six Japanese filtering capacitors
  • 2 +12V CS330060-E filtering choke for 1200W requirement - one big choke would have likely been too big to fit
  • 6 IR's MOS rectifier, more reducing loss and increasing efficiency than conventional diodes - seems to indicate synchronous rectification to me... and I counted eight
  • Full bridge 1200W transformer, with smaller size performing 100% completed output - suggests a high switching frequency
  • Excellent MOS, increased heat sink surfaces, improving cooling performance
  • 6x32 input high-speed blowing fuse, preventing excessive failure - only if the fuse blows fast enough
  • (Relay) Lower impedance, increasing efficiency, degrading inrush current - now how the heck is a relay going to help AC to DC conversion efficiency? It's just a switch!
  • High performance Infineon's PFC MOSFET
  • High precision OCP sensing resistor
  • 105°C, 450V, two Japanese primary capacitors at 390uF, above industry standard, efficiency performance equal to 560uF, 85°C, 400- if you say so. The load testing will tell us the story on efficiency, and I doubt the capacitor selection alone will have much to do with it.

I'm glad all that typing is over with. Down in the bottom left corner, there are three interesting scope shots with a small blurb about how this unit keeps ripple under 40mV. We'll just see about that.

Still another side of the box holds a picture of the connectors on the unit, and how many. Darn - only two 8 pin PCI-E connectors. No 8 pin + 6 pin watt hogger video cards in three way on this thing without adaptors, unfortunately.

Popping open the lid, the first thing I saw was a mild mannered owner's manual. Maybe the magician's name was Impervio the Abbreviated. But no, as soon as I opened up the manual, I found it all in English with a surprisingly complete amount of information on this unit inside. No instructions on how to actually mount the unit, but odds are pretty good that if you just bought this thing you probably already know how to plug/unplug connectors and run four screws into small threaded holes.

Beneath a cardboard divider, the power supply itself lurks. A good portion of the box is devoted to enough cabling to choke a donkey. I'll just get this thing unpacked so you can see.

The contents of the box are somewhat sparse. There's a power supply of course, a little bag of zip ties and screws, and a massive 14 gauge power cord. The power supply is painted... yes, yes, I can just make it out... black!!! Matte black, to be specific. Nice finish.

The top of the unit features this nifty embossed Silverstone logo. In my Aluminus case, this would face upwards, where nobody could see it. Doh! But maybe you have a window in the top of your case where you could show this off better than I. It's a nice touch, all the same.

Indeed, this unit has an 80mm fan. And, it's on the front panel much like the Etasis built Zeus models of yore, the ST85ZF and ST75ZF. This gives me some hope that the unit won't be screaming loud with that fan running all out.

And now, a label/table set for you all to look at.

Silverstone
ZU1200M

3.3V

5V

12V1

12V2

12V3

12V4

12V5

12V6

-12V

+5VSB

28A

30A

17A

17A

17A

17A

17A

17A

0.5A

4A

Max Power

180W

1140W

6W

20W

1200W

Now, since this model can be set for single 12V mode, I'm going to do a bonus table.

Silverstone
ZU1200M

3.3V

5V

12V

-12V

+5VSB

28A

30A

95A

0.5A

4A

Max Power

180W

1140W

6W

20W

1200W

The unit certainly boasts an awful lot of capacity, doesn't it? Unfortunately, as always, I cannot load test the 12V rail(s) past a combined 71A or so. So, again, I'll go as far as I can and see what goes down.

We certainly have some long tentacles on this bad boy. I'll just throw a net over the unit and get them all into table format for you.

Type of connector: Silverstone
ZU1200M
ATX connector (550mm) 24 pin
4 x 2 12V Xeon/EPS connector (750mm) 2*
2 x 2 12V connectors (750mm) 1*
2 x 4 PCIe (550mm) 2**
2 x 3 PCIe (+150mm, 550mm) 4
5.25" Drive connectors (500mm+250mm+250mm) 6
3.5" Drive connectors (+150mm) 2
SATA Drive power connectors (500mm+250mm+250mm) 6


*one EPS12V connector splits apart
**8 pin PCI-E connectors are 6+2 pin modular type

I have to admit that, for a 1200W unit, this puppy seems a bit light on the cabling, even though said cables are as long as a Texas summer day. Not only are we missing the ability to add a third 8 pin PCI-E connection, but if you're looking to run a pile of hard drives you could be running into having to use splitters and adaptors.

The 12V rail distribution is given inside the owner's manual, and since you can set this beast to single 12V anyway I've decided to save myself some typing here. It will suffice to say that there are enough 12V rails to almost give each connector its own 12V rail.


 

JonnyGURU Feeds
Add our RSS feeds to your favorite RSS Reader or homepage.

JonnyGURU Reviews
AddThis Feed Button

JonnyGURU News
AddThis Feed Button

JonnyGURU Articles
AddThis Feed Button

JonnyGURU Forums
AddThis Feed Button

Follow us onFollow Us!
 
Site-Info | Affiliates | Contact Us | Site-Map
Copyright © 2012 - JonnyGURU.com