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Old 06-23-2013
SwashBuccaneer SwashBuccaneer is offline
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Default Adding More Fans

I'm using a Corsair Carbide 300r case which by default has 1 x 140mm Front intake fan and 1 x 120mm rear exhaust fan installed.

I bought a couple more 120mm fans and decided to mount 1 on top of the case as exhaust above my CPU. I'm now trying to figure out if I would be better off adding the 2nd fan in the front as an intake or adding it to the side of the case as intake.

Any feedback?
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Old 06-23-2013
shovenose shovenose is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SwashBuccaneer View Post
I'm using a Corsair Carbide 300r case which by default has 1 x 140mm Front intake fan and 1 x 120mm rear exhaust fan installed.

I bought a couple more 120mm fans and decided to mount 1 on top of the case as exhaust above my CPU. I'm now trying to figure out if I would be better off adding the 2nd fan in the front as an intake or adding it to the side of the case as intake.

Any feedback?
The side intake is really only useful to cool graphics cards rather pointless otherwise (in my opinion)
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Old 06-23-2013
allikat allikat is offline
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9 times out of 10 you're better off blocking off the side fan vent and putting that fan in the front - unless your cable management is based on the "rat's nest" scheme.
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Old 06-23-2013
SwashBuccaneer SwashBuccaneer is offline
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What's the best/easiest way to block the side vent? Rat's nest...LOL awesome.
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Old 06-25-2013
SwashBuccaneer SwashBuccaneer is offline
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I could also move the 2nd front intake to the top as a 2nd exhaust too, I suppose.
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Old 07-20-2013
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Better to have the two front intakes, as I assume you're using a tower air cooler?

What happens when you have the second top exhaust (the "front-top") is that air gets sucked out of the case before it can make it to the CPU cooler, depriving your HSF of some of the air it needs to efficiently cool your processor.

Although my two main rigs are water cooled (custom loops), I do build PC's for friends and others for myself (home file and media servers, HTPC, etc) that are either fully air cooled or utilize a hybrid air/water cooling method.
I have found that there are a few things you can do to any build to GREATLY enhance the ability of its air cooling, which are:
- Remove any and all unused HDD cages, and for the cages that can't be removed or are still in use, remove any unused drive caddies
- Mount a second set of intake fans on the internal side of the HDD cages (same idea as the newer NZXT cases with their internal swivel fan mounts), which acts as a "pull" fan to the front fans' "push", greatly increasing airflow through this highly restrictive area and maintaining a much greater amount of airflow velocity
- HIDE YOUR CABLES! I've done upgrades on so many friends PC's I've lost count, but even if I'm doing something completely unrelated, I always (for free, because I'm a great friend ) do some cable management; sometimes it's just a little, sometimes it requires a full overhaul; I have seen processor temps drop as much as 15C and GPU's by over 25C simply from making every cable invisible (and obviously out of any possible airflow path; just tucking them in HDD cages isn't a good plan)
- HIGH STATIC PRESSURE FANS are just as important for case cooling as they are for heatsinks or radiators; in fact, due to the non-symmetrical nature of most computer cases' restrictions, they can arguably provide even greater benefit. I would get into the habit of ignoring airflow (CFM) specs unless the fan has an adequate amount of static pressure (mmH2O, inH2O, or Pascals); I personally go by the following rules for static pressure.... 2mmH2O absolute minimum for general fan, 2.5mm minimum for intake/exhaust, 3mmH2O minimum for restricted intake, 3.5mmH2O minimum for Heatsink; for radiators I go by FPI... 3.5mmH2O minimum for 12fpi or less, 4.5mmH2O for 13-19fpi, and 20fpi+ at least 5-5.5mmH2O; it's overkill, but it's likely to more than double your case's current airflow exchange rate
- Cut out the "fan grills" that are stamped out of the case sheet metal, and replace them with simple wire grills; the reason is that the stamped ones (see: every exhaust fan mount ever) block between 58-65% of airflow, but not only that, they also create a TON of turbulence due to having so much flat surface area, resulting in little "hot swirly pockets" of air. Round wire fan grills only block ~5-11% of airflow, but because wire is by definition round, and round is far more aerodynamic than flat, the air easily slips around the fan grill and exits. Not only does this increase airflow by more than 100% in most cases, it also greatly reduces noise (grill cut out and replaced with wire grill is quieter than stock grill + any fan silencer + soft-mount)
- Remove any unused PCI Slot Plates to give air an extra place to exit; this is important as, despite generally being the location just under the hottest component in a PC, it is the area most likely to develop hot, stagnant air. If your GPU is a "blower type" (shroud + exhausts out the back of case) then this is less important, but if it's a "dumps heat inside case" type, then this can significantly impact GPU temps, particularly if you have a fan helping force the air out from this area (doesn't even have to be powerful; I've seen a 32cfm 80x25mm fan result in 15C+ drops on a dual-fan 7970)

I HIGHLY recommend going for a positive pressure fan layout, which is having more total airflow IN than out. Generally, I find a 3:2 ratio is ideal, but it varies slightly, on a "case by case basis" (bwahahahaha! *hangs head*).
Not only does this naturally reduce dust buildup, it helps prevent hot-spots by pushing air out of any little crack in the case rather than pulling it in. Done right, you can even have an intake-only setup and get better temps than you would adding a single exhaust. It's just complicated, as you have to account for airflow lost to restrictive areas like around drive cages, so simply using the same fan in every location and having 3 intakes and 2 exhausts doesn't quite do it. This is also a very beneficial cooling method for "blower type" GPU coolers.

Lastly, to quote my buddy Doyll over @ OCN, "You want airFLOW, not airBLOW". That means, air needs to have a good path in, through, and out; look at your case as a wind tunnel, because the faster and more efficiently you can move air through it, the better the cooling. The slower and more constricted the airflow, the worse the cooling (air quickly loses it's ability to cool as it passes more components and gains heat, eventually becoming an insulator). You DON'T want to be spot-cooling everything, it's incredibly inefficient and it works quite poorly as well (the only exceptions would be motherboard VRM areas, which can get quite toasty; having a pair of 40-80mm fans directly over top and blowing down onto the MOSFETs is almost mandatory for a lot of boards if OC'ing high).
Oh, and if you have push-pull on your CPU cooler, get rid of the rear exhaust fan, and instead just have the rear grill cut-out and replaced with a wire grill. Having both a fan at the rear of the cooler as well as an exhaust fan creates a lot of turbulence and greatly reduces actual airflow.


Hope this was helpful, and thanks for having me on your forum!
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