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Old 04-11-2013
garegin garegin is offline
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Default noob question about speakers and amps

1. as far as I understand amps are not built inside regular speakers and are on the board of the device like an ipod of a PC notherboard.
2. you always need an amp, without it speakers won't work right. or do you?
3. amps can overpower a speaker by giving it too many watts. so then how does the motherboard know not to give too much to a puny speaker vs. a beefy one.

the reason I'm saying this is because I have come across a laptop in which the motherboard is overheating the speakers and breaking them.

I'm bit of an electronics noobs and only have a basic idea of how electricity works inside computers. don't know much about how sound and speakers work.
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Old 04-12-2013
mariush mariush is offline
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Regular computer speakers HAVE an audio amplifier in them, hidden in the speaker that has power input and the audio input. On home cinema systems, the amplifier is in the receiver or subwoofer and the speakers receive the amplified signal from that amplifier. The computer or ipod only sends an audio signal that may or may not be amplified to a certain degree - so low you may not even hear the sound on those big speakers.

There are some speakers that don't have any audio amplifier, relying on the small amplifier built inside the audio chip on the motherboard or the sound card. These speakers are however low power, usually up to 1-2 watts in total.

The sound cards in computer have a small amplifier which is generally designed for headphones or to act as a pre-amplifier for the amplifier inside standalone speakers. These small amplifiers are usually.. small, producing 0.5-1watts or something like that, they're not ment to output to big speakers.

Laptops will usually have a separate audio amplifier for those 2 speakers inside, computer motherboards and most sound cards don't have such audio amplifier because the separate speakers have amplifier in them.

Your laptop is just badly designed and probably the speakers are overheating from the laptop itself being hot, not as a consequence of the amplifier sending too many watts to the speaker or stuff like that.
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Old 04-12-2013
garegin garegin is offline
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thanks for the thorough info. is there a book you can recommend for noobs regarding the marriage of audio and electricity?
back to the topic. The speakers are definitely getting hot from the input source. the computer is completely dismantled and even though its cool as heck the speakers gradually heat up to a very high degree. (above 50-60C). It is possible the motherboard's preamp is sending too much power?
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Old 04-17-2013
walterm walterm is offline
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Not sure about laptop speakers. Most speakers use a coil to produce sound. Current going to the speaker produces a) sound energy b) heat in the coil.
What it sounds like is the motherboard chip or circuit is overdriving the coil in the speakers which are dissipating the energy as heat.
If this is a motherboard problem about all you can do is attempt to use add on speakers or USB headphones.
It is possible the wrong sound drivers are responsible, though unlikely.
Worth checking.
Also check the speakers are the original specification, ie same as originally came with laptop.
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