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  #1  
Old 03-22-2013
Mr2Much Mr2Much is offline
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Default PC Shutdown: Motherboard or PSU or ?

Hello! First time caller, long time listener.

I have a PC I assembled ~4 years ago.
The parts concerned are as follows:
MB: Asus P5Q SE Plus
CPU: Intel E5200
GPU: XFX GX260
PSU: Antec Tru-Power 550W

All the above items were purchased new for this build EXCEPT the PSU. I had stripped that out of a previous build, so it is ~7 years old.

My issue is that over the last week it has stop working twice, but maintained power status. By that I mean, the fans and lights all keep working, there is just no signal to the display. The fan on the CPU and GPU all function. and the MB light stays lit. When you restart, there is NO BIOS POST. I have removed everything and worked both backwards & forwards. No POST. I have tried RAM in different slots Individual RAM. GPU in but no RAM. RAM in but no GPU. No GPU & no RAM. Nothing could generate a POST.

So I checked the PSU manually with a volt meter. Everything seemed within parameters. I do not have an extra psu, so I did not try that.

Running out of ideas, I moved the jumper to reset the BIOS and removed the CMOS battery. Put everything back and BAM! I got POST. Everything starts right back up perfectly.

I was willing to call it a one-off, but as I said, it has happened twice in less than week. I started thinking the MB or CPU. So I talked with a couple of friends and they think that it is the PSU. They think that due to it's age and consistent usage that it is no longer reliable and is fluctuating under a load.

Now, I know under my manual volt meter test I am not putting it under a load, but I have had PSU problems in the past and never had to jump the BIOS to get the system to restart under minimal conditions.

I would appreciate another opinion or thought on the matter.

Thanks.
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Old 03-22-2013
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Decent chance the capacitors in the PSU have had it due to old age and general junkiness. I believe that unit hailed from when Antec was using capacitors best defined in terms of excrement.

Even if the PSU isn't at the heart of the problem, I think I'd replace it. My guess is that it's the issue though.
Another possibility is that the motherboard's battery is right on the edge of being out of juice and randomly drops low enough that the BIOS loses some, but not all, of its settings.
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Old 03-23-2013
Mr2Much Mr2Much is offline
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It has worked well on pretty much a daily basis for 7 years, so I can't complain too much.

I think you are right about it being time to replace. I was leaning that way already. I was just questioning the symptom. I have seen a couple of instability failures, but never one that required me to go through so many hoops.

I was also thinking about the CMOS battery. I picked one up the other day and was planning to replace.

Possibly one issue triggering another weak link?
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Old 03-23-2013
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Even if you remove the CMOS battery entirely, the system will still POST and display info on the screen. It isn't required for the system to function. It's only required to save settings & system info so the BIOS can boot faster next time around.

That's definitely an older system... if you want you can grab a flashlight and look through the 120mm fan, inspect the tops of the large caps you can see... see if any are bulging or leaking.
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Old 04-01-2013
Mr2Much Mr2Much is offline
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Unit was shutting down a dozen times a day (simply rebooting). At least I no longer had to jump the CMOS.

OK, so I got a new PSU (Corsair TX650M).

I install it and the unit goes into continuous start-stop. Runs for 2 seconds, stops for 2 seconds, runs for 2 seconds. Keeps going like this continuously until I kill the switch on the back of the psu.

I replug in the old psu and it does the same thing now too.

I take the new psu and do the paperclip test. Fan runs for 3 seconds than shuts off. The live leads still show normal voltages on my meter. Is this normal for this psu? Do the fans stop running when not needed?

So I plug in new psu (just 24-pin and 4-pin cpu) and begin removing parts.
I eventually have MB on test board and it still has same problem with either power supply.

Now I am wondering, DOA new PSU? Bad MB? Bad CPU?

One thing I noticed, the CPU fan was not seated properly (had gotten loose). Temp monitors had never noted anything outside normal parameters, and maybe I jarred loose installing the new PSU. So I cleaned, reapplied thermal paste, and reinstalled the fan.

Any thoughts would be appreciated.

Thanks.
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Last edited by Mr2Much; 04-01-2013 at 11:01 AM.
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Old 04-01-2013
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c_hegge c_hegge is offline
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PSU killed your board. Those older Fuhjyyu'd Antecs (ie. Antec PSUs with Fuhjyyu capacitors) were notorious for it. They do have 100% failure rates, and will kill your board every time if you don't catch them early. Personally, I've never seen one of those PSU's last longer than 3 years before the caps went bad. I caught most of them early and replaced them, but a few were boards were killed by them.

FWIW, any really well designed PSU with entirely Japanese capacitors will easily give you 10 years + of 24/7 use.
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Old 05-04-2013
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I think that problem can be connected with a video card also. some time ago my PC rebooted many times and I couldn't understand why - I've checked motheboard, ram, hdd without results and it has been continued until I reinstalled video card drivers.
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Old 05-22-2013
DarylOwen DarylOwen is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kougar View Post
Even if you remove the CMOS battery entirely, the system will still POST and display info on the screen. It isn't required for the system to function. It's only required to save settings & system info so the BIOS can boot faster next time around.

That's definitely an older system... if you want you can grab
led flashlights and look through the 120mm fan, inspect the tops of the large caps you can see... see if any are bulging or leaking.
it is indeed very old system you need to get one very soon. It is not worth to spend more money on it.

Last edited by DarylOwen; 05-23-2013 at 05:59 AM.
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Old 05-22-2013
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^
I disagree. Anything Core 2 based or newer (other than Celeron) is totally worth fixing IMO.
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