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Thread: Teen killed while working on computer

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stefan Payne View Post
    I think the problem was the usual: The kid tried to modify the PSU because the fan was too loud. But it had no clue what the hell he was doing.
    I've seen that many times in german forums. Where some people put an 800rpm fan in a 750W Corsair TX or something like that...
    No, it wasn't. All M12/S12 II units (including the TX650) are quiet regardless of the loading levels. You're thinking of the TX850 and the TX950, both of which get loud under high heat/high loading conditions.

    Quote Originally Posted by Stefan Payne View Post
    PS: I've read comments like 'you can change the fan without any problems, that's no big deal' many many times. And I've told them that it isn't true. Changing a fan in a PSU is a big deal. Especially if the one doing it has no idea of what he's doing...
    And yes, you very well can easily replace the fan. It's no "big deal". Just unplug your PSU's AC cable while your machine is working. Then plug it back in, turn on the machine and unplug it right away. This is the easiest way to discharge the caps, then there will be nothing to be worried about.

  2. #12
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    Teen electrocuted by a PSU that wasn't plugged in, huh?




    Sure.
    Careful what you wish for... You just might get it.

  3. #13
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    A wise man once said "Son, never stick your dick in crazy, or a PSU".

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    OK. Now I'm curious. Just what is a bleeder resistor?

    And from jonny or OW: what is the best procedure to follow to fully discharge the caps of a psu?

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    A bleeder resistor is usually like a 1W resistor across the primary caps to drain their charge when the PSU is off, specifically to prevent incidents like this.
    It's my PSU in a box!
    Ooo-ooh,
    My PSU in a box, baby!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Oklahoma Wolf View Post
    With proper bleeder resistors
    Not all PSUs do have such a thing...

    Quote Originally Posted by Oklahoma Wolf View Post
    Either way, there are a lot of unanswered questions with this one.
    I agree.
    But that's modern journalism. Just make a story, if it sounds wrong in the eyes of people who know stuff about what you're making a story of, don't care at all.

    All we know is that this kid must have messed with a PSU. If it was pluged in or not we don't really know. Although they say it was not pluged in. But still: Those primary caps have an awful lot of energy stored, that still could kill you...

  8. #17
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    So, what do we do? Turn them off, leave them plugged in and allow them to drain? I occasionally tear down a cheap PSU to get the stuff inside.
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    Short the main filter caps with a good sized resistor. Don't use a screwdriver, unless you don't like the screwdriver. Some caps can store a charge big enough to take a chunk of metal out of a screwdriver tip.

    Do not open up a PSU while it's plugged in, ever, unless you really know what you are doing.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Oklahoma Wolf View Post
    Short the main filter caps with a good sized resistor. Don't use a screwdriver, unless you don't like the screwdriver. Some caps can store a charge big enough to take a chunk of metal out of a screwdriver tip.

    Do not open up a PSU while it's plugged in, ever, unless you really know what you are doing.
    Hmm. Main filter caps. This just proves I don't know enough to mess with these things.

    What would happen if I unplugged the power cord and ran a piece of scrap metal over the prongs?

    If all else fails, how long should I let a PSU sit, powered down, before messing with it?

    Filter caps. Better look at some pics from some reviews. I wonder if they have some at JG . . . ?
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    The two big-ass electrolytics, and I'd recommend doing it to the X capacitors as well. X-caps hold less charge than the main bulk electrolytics, but they hold it much longer.
    It's my PSU in a box!
    Ooo-ooh,
    My PSU in a box, baby!

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