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Thread: Dead psu upgrading to a 1200 but which one?

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    Default Dead psu upgrading to a 1200 but which one?

    I was running 2x MSI 465GTX's in sli, 2x lightscribe blu-ray combo drives, AMD 1090T 6 core, 2xCorsair 500GB SSD (ahci raid I believe it was), 4x Hitachi 1TB 7200's (one set as a mirror other as stripe) and 16GB DDR3, 3x120mm fans, 5x240mm fans and a Zalman 120mm cpu fan all running on an Rosewill 700w PSU and after two weeks dead psu, (borrowed dads Antec PSU tester and it confirmed).

    Looking at neweggs psu caculator I need 1062w recommended, reading other posts this may or may not be true. Nonetheless I'm going to go for broke with a 1200w because even if I don't need it now I always have room to expand.

    So with price being a nonessential:
    Antec TPQ, Antec HCP, Thermaltake TP, Corsair AX1200 or Coolermaster Silent Pro Gold?

    I'm asking here as the store tech said the PSU he sold me was adequate and it died and I'm kinda new at building gaming rigs.

    Thanks in advance

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    Newegg's PSU calculator is garbage. Don't take advice from someone who's trying to sell you something.

    Which Rosewill were you using? The RV2? If so they aren't exactly high quality. Not terrible, but I guess I could see one failing under consistently high load like that.



    Anyway, you don't need a 1200W. Seriously. Even as "headroom" or "expansion room" or whatever, unless you're going tri-SLI GTX580s you will never use it and you'll have spent $300 when you could have spent $150 or less.

    A high quality 750W will be more than ample. You could buy a SeaSonic X750 or Corsair AX850, or save even more money and go for an XFX Black Edition 750W. I guarantee 100% that it will work for your system.
    It's my PSU in a box!
    Ooo-ooh,
    My PSU in a box, baby!

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    A high quality 750W will be more than ample. You could buy a SeaSonic X750 or Corsair AX850, or save even more money and go for an XFX Black Edition 750W. I guarantee 100% that it will work for your system.
    +1, the Corsair AX850 and the XFX 750 (or their 850 for that matter) will provide all the power you'll ever need. What I am curious about is what kind of case takes 5 240mm fans?!

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    For 2x 465's and a 1090T, you don't need a 1200W. But I would suggest an 850W. The Corsair AX850 or Antech HCP 850 are good suggestions for a modular PSU. If you want to save some money, the TX850 or XFX Pro850W, especially now that it has a MIR, are great choices.

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    The eXtreme PSU Calculator Lite is my favorite calculator because it lets you plug in just about anything and the developers are constantly updating it. I was happy to see it listed on the JonnyGuru Links page. I used it with the following settings:

    Motherboard: Highend - Desktop
    CPU Utilization (TDP): 100% TDP
    250mm Fans: 5 (they don't have 240 - and BTW, what case supports 5 240mm fans?)
    120mm Fans: 3
    System Load: 100%
    Capacitor aging: 30%
    Other settings based on listed hardware

    (Yes, those are the extreme settings, but with his listed hardware, especially the number of drives and fans, this is an extreme machine that doesn't sound like it will be sitting around idling.)
    I get a recommended PSU wattage of 1056W. And using the paid pro version (which I recommend), I get the same. With those settings, I agree that 1200W is more than needed. But It would seem that anything less than 1000W may be too small if the system is taxed. And definitely would not leave any wiggle room for yet a 3rd graphics card, or any overclocking. So it seems to me, 1200W may be right in this case.

    Even going conservative with Regular motherboard, 90% TDP, and System Load at 90%, I get 946W. Note I always use 30% capacitor aging to compensate for heavy use and aging over the next 3 years. If I move aging down to 20%, I get 877W, which is more in line with the 850W recommendations, but I suspect with 6 drives and 8 fans, this system is expected to be heavily used and so, if me, I would lean towards the more extreme settings and higher wattage recommendations.

    I do note he said price did not matter. The Antec HCP 1200W got a great (9.5) review here.

    @ntwillea - judging by your selected hardware and comments about price, I don't think it matters to you, but I make it a point to ensure folks are aware that using a 3rd Party cooler on a "retail" boxed version of a CPU that comes with a supplied fan affects the warranty of the CPU. AMD is very clear in their AMD CPU Warranty,
    "This Limited Warranty shall be null and void if the AMD microprocessor which is the subject of this Limited Warranty is used with any heatsink/fan other than the one provided herewith."
    Again, if that does not concern you, no big deal. But it is important to know the facts.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Digerati View Post
    But It would seem that anything less than 1000W may be too small if the system is taxed.
    It would seem that way, except the calculator is wrong. A 750W PSU would be capable of handling that system. An 850W unit like Jon suggested would give a little more wiggle room, but anything more than that is certainly not necessary.
    Main: i5 2500K@4.6GHz w/Zalman CNPS10X Performa, Intel DZ68BC, 8GB G.Skill DDR3-1600, PNY GTX 470 + EVGA GTX 470, ASUS Xonar DX, ADATA S510 120GB, Samsung 1TB F3+1TB F1+2TB F4, Kingwin LZG 1kW, Lian-Li PC-9F, Dell U2212HM+S2209W, Win7 Professional.
    Laptop: Dell Vostro 3450, i5 2410M, 8GB DDR3-1333, AMD Radeon HD 6630M 1GB, Intel X25-M 80GB, Seagate Momentus 750GB, Win7 Home Premium.

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    I agree that 1200w would be overkill. My Corsair AX850 has no problems with two GTX 470s, and i7-870, SSD, two hard drives, liquid cooling, and a ton of fans.

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    Sorry Digerati, but you are wasting your time using those Power calculators.
    They are badly outdated. They over-Spec due to some assumptions that are no longer valid (with newer, higher efficiency, better quality PSU)

    The 465 will not ever pull more than 200 watts

    http://www.guru3d.com/article/evga-g...65-sc-review/5

    Realistically, in SLI, never more than 300 watts.

    Adding 300 watts for MB and CPU only gets you up to 600 watts.

    fans and HD are not going to get you up to the numbers you came up with using the calculator.

    An 850 watt will run this rig for its life without any problem.

    Use a Killawatt meter while gaming and I am sure you will be pulling less than 600 watts.

    If you want a 1200 watt, that's great, it just won't get you anything except the ability to run insane cards in tri-SLI in the future.


    Regarding the CPU cooler, you really need to let go of this FUD.
    I have a stack of AMD stock coolers that I use for paper weights.
    The difference between stock coolers and After market is day and night. (what you would expect for paying up to half more than the cost of the CPU itself)

    As everyone knows, better cooling extends the life of electronics.
    Read any of these reviews to see a list of about 50 after-market coolers that out-perform the stock.
    http://www.frostytech.com/top5heatsinks.cfm

    There are dozens of ways that are more important to void your warranty and or damage your equipment.
    Using aftermarket coolers is not on the list of anyone's concern.
    Last edited by mdk777; 02-05-2011 at 01:25 PM.

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    The 465 will not ever pull more than 200 watts
    Unless unlocked to 470 and OC'd.

    But still 850W would be clearly enough.

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    Sorry Digerati, but you are wasting your time using those Power calculators.
    They are badly outdated. They over-Spec due to some assumptions that are no longer valid (with newer, higher efficiency, better quality PSU)
    Those calculators? I only mentioned one. The best one around, IMO. What do you use? Guesses? I mean no disrespect by that, but seriously, what do you use? How did you factor in 8 large case fans? 6 drives (in RAIDs)? What is the REAL power requirement for the 465 GTX? How much does that motherboard need?

    Okay, 200W max for the card. He has two to start. Your own link says 700W for two, and another 200W if adding a 3rd. So now we are up to 900W - busting your 850 recommendation. And according to NeoSeeker reviews, the 1090T can draw almost 100W more than the i7 965 used in your link.

    fans and HD are not going to get you up to the numbers you came up with using the calculator.
    Oh? He has 4 HDs configured in RAIDs which means they will all run at once. Drives typically require 10 to 30W each. 8 large case fans! As seen here, just the 120mm 12V fans can draw up to 9.6W each. He has 3 of those and 5 240mm.

    The eXtreme calculator certainly is not perfect, but it is constantly being updated as new CPUs and GPUs come out. Unless you are going to research the power demands of each component yourself (assuming the maker publishes it), you are only guessing. This particular calculator is extremely flexible, with an extensive list of CPUs, cards, memory, etc. Okay, it may buffer the results a little - but in my opinion, that overhead is necessary to provide some future proofing, and compensation for degradation due to age.

    I said (or implied) earlier that the 850W will be fine, if you don't compensate for aging and know there will be no future upgrades. I still stand by that. But that adds little to no room for any additional upgrades or aging, so I still contend 1000W should be the minimum so there is no need to buy a bigger supply down the road when he decides to OC or buy a 3rd graphics card.

    Noise is something else to consider. A 850W supply will be running at near capacity most of the time. While a 1000W will be running at about 80 to 85% capacity and a 1200W at about 66% capacity. The larger supplies should be able to toggle down their fan speed while the 850W supply will likely be pushing its fan to capacity. Although with 8 case fans, CPU fan, and GPU fans, not sure PSU fan noise matters here.

    I am definitely NOT one to automatically say bigger is better. I truly believe in properly sizing a PSU. But, if a computer needs 700W, the power draw (and electricity costs) from the wall is the same, regardless if the PSU is 850W or 1200W (assuming similar efficiencies and with 80Plus certifications, that is a pretty safe assumption). Therefore, to ensure the user can expect years of use, to include compensation for upgrades like adding a 3rd graphics card, and for natural degradation of the supply due to aging, I see easy justification to recommend spending a little extra for a 1000W supply in this user's scenario over 850W, and definitely over a 750W.

    Unless unlocked to 470 and OC'd.
    Good point.

    But please! I'm come here to share what I know - but to learn from learned and experienced members too. But I'm a "show me" type of guy. If you can show me where I'm wrong, I'm listening.

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