Results 1 to 4 of 4

Thread: Traces on PSU boards

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    131
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    1
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    0
    Thanked in
    0 Posts

    Default Traces on PSU boards

    Could someone help answer this for me;

    I think I'm right that a single piece of wire say 1mm thick can take less amps than say a piece of wire with 50 strands but still 1mm thick.

    So how is it possible for a PCB trace in a PSU to take the massive AMPs in todays latest PSU's?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Moderator
    Posts
    6,504
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    149
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    3
    Thanked in
    2 Posts

    Default

    The traces usually don't need to go far, and when they do thicker traces are often used.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    131
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    1
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    0
    Thanked in
    0 Posts

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Oklahoma Wolf View Post
    The traces usually don't need to go far, and when they do thicker traces are often used.
    Thanks

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    514
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    0
    Thanked in
    0 Posts

    Default

    I don't know much about mobo design itself, but wire thickness is proportional to amp carrying capacity, ie thicker wire will carry more and heat up less. There are at least 2 simple equations, one is ohms law. I can give you the other if you are interested.

    It defines the resistance of a piece of wire...

    It Resistance, R = ro ( a greek letter, to do with the type of metal, say copper or silver ) times length divided by area.

    Incidentally, capacitance has a similar equation, so does inductance.

    Capacitance = epsilon nought(another greek letter to do with the dielectric..insulator between the metal plates) times Area of plates, divided by distance plates are apart.

    ( a cap is just 2 pieces of metal with an insulator in the middle, akin a sandwich, usually rolled up into a swiss roll shape.

    so for wire resistance, shorter length or fatter area means less resistance, means less power dissipated into heat, which may in extremes fuse the metal.

    power lost( heat) = (current squared) times resistance ( which is why power cables use low current(high volts) and thick wires)

    For voltage its all about insulation thickness.

    Its poss. that the monster ampages the rails sort of split or divide up, so the capacity is shared??
    Last edited by ianm2; 01-07-2007 at 03:03 PM.

Similar Threads

  1. 8 to Dual 8 Pin EPS for high power current generation Boards
    By Dirtymacho in forum PC Power Supply Discussion
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 03-04-2017, 12:53 PM
  2. Help with testing a PCB boards
    By Pats12 in forum Electronic Component Discussion
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 07-29-2014, 12:35 PM
  3. need help, any links to good psu for older platforms? ie s478 boards?
    By Hondacity in forum PC Power Supply Discussion
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 08-20-2011, 10:06 PM
  4. Gigabyte DS3/S3 boards frying ram?
    By Hutch in forum General PC Hardware
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 03-15-2007, 11:01 PM
  5. Anyone here used the onboard RAID on nforce 4 boards?
    By SixIron in forum General PC Hardware
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 12-23-2006, 03:58 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •