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Thread: EVGA W1 500W... Oops!

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    Default EVGA W1 500W... Oops!

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=60jV...ature=youtu.be

    20g wire on the PCIe!!!! WTF?!?!!?

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    Wow. I’m just... Stunned.

    Also this from comments: “Corsair PSUs are way better since there is a whole team supporting them, and Jon Gerow is their R&D manager, and this guy KNOWs about PSUs!”
    Lol

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    Quote Originally Posted by dc-dc_conversion_police View Post
    Wow. I’m just... Stunned.

    Also this from comments: “Corsair PSUs are way better since there is a whole team supporting them, and Jon Gerow is their R&D manager, and this guy KNOWs about PSUs!”
    Lol
    I'm flattered. ;-)

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    But it's EVGA !

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    OK, what am I missing

    EVGA 500W Review - Another One (PSU) Bites the Dust - YouTube
    "According to the specs, this bridge rectifier cannot exceed 3A at 100 degrees Celsius without a heatsink."

    GBU1- Series.qxd (farnell.com)
    GBU 1006
    "Maximum Average Forward Rectified Currentat TC = 100°C" 10A


    Would have been nice if Aris had actually tested to see if it really was the bridge rectifier that had failed.
    Last edited by ashiekh; 11-24-2020 at 03:51 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ashiekh View Post
    OK, what am I missing

    EVGA 500W Review - Another One (PSU) Bites the Dust - YouTube
    "According to the specs, this bridge rectifier cannot exceed 3A at 100 degrees Celsius without a heatsink."

    GBU1- Series.qxd (farnell.com)
    GBU 1006
    "Maximum Average Forward Rectified Currentat TC = 100°C" 10A
    When mounted to a 100mm x 100mm x 1.6mm copper plate.

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    I was looking at


    • Typical Thermal Resistance Per Leg (Note 1)(Note 2) 21 C/W


    which makes the circuit board itself a plausible heat-sink; 4 legs yields 5.25 C/W
    and so 53C for 10W and so 9A (voltage drop is about 1.1V).

    Now the supply is 500W so only 6A, so the temperature rise might be a lot
    less than 50C if the board is itself a good heatsink and that would keep the
    junction temperature below 100C even with a high ambient.

    So I am not at all convinced that Aris is right.
    Last edited by ashiekh; 11-26-2020 at 01:34 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ashiekh View Post
    GBU1- Series.qxd (farnell.com)
    GBU 1006
    "Maximum Average Forward Rectified Currentat TC = 100°C" 10A


    Would have been nice if Aris had actually tested to see if it really was the bridge rectifier that had failed.
    Wrong datasheet. You're looking at a GBU1006 made by Multicomp.

    The bridge in the EVGA is a GBU1006 made by HY. http://www.hygroup.com.tw/en-ww/prod...D=10251,11640-
    http://www.hygroup.com.tw/upfiles/AD...U1010(GBU).pdf

    "Maximum Average Forward Rectified Current @ TC=100°C (without heatsink) = 3.0A"

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    ashiekh (11-24-2020), crmaris (11-25-2020)

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    From the HY specs
    54-GBU10005-GBU1010(GBU).pdf


    • Typical Thermal Resistance to case (Note2) 2 C/W
    • Typical Thermal Resistance to lead (Note2) 1.5 C/W


    which still suggests that dumping heat down the leads is a good way to go, potentially better even than a case mounted heatsink.
    Last edited by ashiekh; 11-24-2020 at 08:14 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ashiekh View Post
    From the HY specs
    54-GBU10005-GBU1010(GBU).pdf


    • Typical Thermal Resistance to case (Note2) 2 C/W
    • Typical Thermal Resistance to lead (Note2) 1.5 C/W


    which still suggests that dumping heat down the leads is a good way to go, potentially better even than a case mounted heatsink.
    I can tell you, from experience, that it's not. I mean, it's not like the diode is more efficient the hotter it gets.

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