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Thread: EVGA W1 500W... Oops!

  1. #41
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    As I keep saying, one can use the circuit board to dump heat through the legs (that is also in the specs)
    How does that matter when rated current declared by the manufacturer is shown to be the same throughout the temperature range?

  2. #42
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    The circuit board is a heat sink... that is why the case AND leg thermal resistances are given. Interestingly the lead thermal resistance is actually less than the case thermal resistance and the heat sink they seem to be referring to is 10cm x 10cm

    54-GBU10005-GBU1010(GBU).pdf (hygroup.com.tw)

    Now the EVGA board looks to be single sided, so may not contain much copper to dissipate the heat. I'm not saying they didn't get it wrong, just that using the circuit board as a heatsink is a valid design option.
    Last edited by ashiekh; 11-26-2020 at 11:48 AM.

  3. #43
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    Why don't you just write to manufacturer directly with question if that method is a valid replacement for dedicated heatsink for getting higher rating current out of that piece, if you're that curious?

    Or you already did and are trying to show us the truth? Then just post their answer instead lmao.

  4. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by rafal_iB_PL View Post
    lmao.

    No need to be offensive.

    There are people here from whom I might learn.

  5. #45
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    lmao is offensive nowadays?

    Anyways, I just pointed you to one way that you can find out for certain.

  6. #46
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    To laugh at someone's suggestion is normally considered rude.

    If I asked them they would rightfully laugh and ask if I was able to read or not; that there was a figure given for the thermal conductivity of the legs and that it was better even than for the case.

    Why would I want to make a fool of myself? (more than I am already; I started with the wrong spec sheet, I took the long way around to figure it is an HEC platform, I even assumed a 500W supply would consume 500W ;-)


    Just so there is no confusion... I am NOT saying EVGA got it right; I am only saying it could be done using the circuit board as a heat sink.
    Last edited by ashiekh; 11-26-2020 at 02:57 PM.

  7. #47
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    Yes. The board is single layer PCB.

    At low input voltages (115V), the bridge rectifier is easily the hottest part in the PSU. Dumping that heat into the PCB is dangerous.

  8. #48
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    I agree that using the circuit board to dump heat is dangerous if one just assumes it will work.


    I have a new question, and this one may merit LMAO

    The GBU-1006 can handle 600V reverse voltage.
    http://www.hygroup.com.tw/upfiles/AD...U1010(GBU).pdf

    Now lets assume one has 340V on the primary capacitor (it is rated for 400V) and with 240V AC one can have a peak reverse of -340V and ... well this time I think I have done something wrong as the reverse voltage would seem to significantly exceed 600V; if so, the problem might be the wrong component more than the design.

    Even more intriguing is the 'other' GBU-1006
    GBU1- Series.qxd (farnell.com)
    can handle 800V


    Is it possible that one GBU-1006 was substituted for another?
    Last edited by ashiekh; 11-26-2020 at 11:43 PM.

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