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Thread: Removed sense wires from 24-pin and tested on Chroma

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    Default Removed sense wires from 24-pin and tested on Chroma

    Because so many people that were sleeving their own cables were complaining about the double wires on the 24-pin, I decided to do an experiment.


    I told everyone that the sense wires were not required for the PSU to work properly, but I was shot down as "not knowing what I was talking about". \_(ツ)_/


    Fact of the matter is, a good PSU should deliver nominal voltage on all rails. Sense wires will tell the PSU if the voltage at the end of these wire are below ideal. And while I agree sense wires do help, the lack of sense wires do not hurt to any extent.

    So here's what I did: http://jongerow.com/no-sense/

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    Juular (08-02-2020), Philipus II (08-02-2020), SilverStone (08-03-2020)

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    Default

    Now I'm being told that "some power supplies require them" without being told which power supplies those are.

    LOL! Some people just like telling others that they're wrong.

    Of course, this is Reddit. In another thread, someone was telling me that EVGA G2 and G3 cables are superior because they have 1-to-1 PCIe and EPS12V cables and that the fact that Seasonic and Corsair use a row of 4 +12V and 4 ground make it unnecessarily difficult to do custom cables.

    FFS! LOL!

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    Why did you cut the wires when you could have just popped the pins out.

    How about just calculate
    https://www.calculator.net/voltage-d...s=10&x=68&y=22

    16 AWG
    5 ft
    10 A

    voltage drop 0.40V

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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ashiekh View Post
    Why did you cut the wires when you could have just popped the pins out.
    Because I have tons of cables and a coworker broke my pin removal tool.

    Seriously.... what's easier? Snip the wires or pop them out of the connector (answer: cut them).

    Quote Originally Posted by ashiekh View Post
    How about just calculate
    https://www.calculator.net/voltage-d...s=10&x=68&y=22

    16 AWG
    5 ft
    10 A

    voltage drop 0.40V
    That.... does not tell you what the voltage is going to be with and without sense wires. All that does is tells you what the resistance of the wire is going to be with different lengths wire and then calculates the voltage drop based on that number. Totally different.

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    Any way.... I'm getting trolled too easily.

    How to prove sense wire isn't required in theory: You want to test a PSU. What do you do? You jump the power on with a ground wire. The PSU powers up and all rails are live. You can test them with a DMM and get voltages, etc.

    You can USE that PSU with none of the wires that have the double wires on them populated or with a load on them and yet the PSU still works.

    So the notion that sense wires is REQUIRED is absolutely horse poop.

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    Default

    Here is a good article about remote sense:

    https://www.edn.com/power-supply-rem...akes-remedies/


    What happens if the sense line is open should be tested during engineering or evaluation of the power supply design.

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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tim@PSUTest View Post
    Here is a good article about remote sense:

    https://www.edn.com/power-supply-rem...akes-remedies/


    What happens if the sense line is open should be tested during engineering or evaluation of the power supply design.
    Yeah. That is a great article.

    So, at least for Corsair, the sense wires are an "after thought". Other PSUs were "beating" Corsair in PSU reviews in the voltage regulation department. Turned out what we were being beat by simply had sense wires. So they were added between the launch of the HXi and HX (non-i).

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    LOL! My post on Reddit was removed by their mods!!!!!!

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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jon Gerow View Post
    Any way.... I'm getting trolled too easily.

    How to prove sense wire isn't required in theory: You want to test a PSU. What do you do? You jump the power on with a ground wire. The PSU powers up and all rails are live. You can test them with a DMM and get voltages, etc.

    You can USE that PSU with none of the wires that have the double wires on them populated or with a load on them and yet the PSU still works.

    So the notion that sense wires is REQUIRED is absolutely horse poop.

    Of course they are not necessary, a lot of supplies don't have them.

    If the resistive drop takes one out of spec (or non-competitive) one has two options

    * heavier cable
    * sense wires

    but if one cuts the sense wires, one has to be careful what happens as the supply may then be trying to compensate.
    i.e. do not conclude that cut sense wires are not doing anything.
    Last edited by ashiekh; 08-01-2020 at 10:35 PM.

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    Default

    I didn't get to see that response, but it's full of obvious points.

    I never implied that sense wires weren't doing anything. In fact, in my post I said, "Again, we see a drop, but not a significant one. Ideally, yes. Leave the sense wires in there."

    Obviously, higher gauge wire results in less voltage drop. Duh.

    It seems like my educated opinion and testing methodology has made someone that is a mod that also makes cables for a living upset and therefore felt the need to delete my post.

    EDIT: I see you edited your post. The troll I was talking about was on Reddit. Not you. So I said "I didn't see that response" because I thought you were referencing something someone said on Reddit before the thread was deleted.
    Last edited by Jon Gerow; 08-02-2020 at 01:50 PM.

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