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Thread: What is the voltage on the SATA plug?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jon Gerow View Post
    It will say on the actual device.
    I mean what is the total or maximum amps the SATA plug from the PSU can supply? And, while we're on the subject, what happens if a device tries to take more than the max amps? Is it protected in some way?

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    Quote Originally Posted by DWD1961 View Post
    I mean what is the total or maximum amps the SATA plug from the PSU can supply?
    Depends on the PSU.

    Quote Originally Posted by DWD1961 View Post
    And, while we're on the subject, what happens if a device tries to take more than the max amps? Is it protected in some way?
    No. Typically the SATA connector at the PSU melts. That's why we saw that as a common problem when people would use SATA for PCIe adapters for cryptocurrency rigs.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jon Gerow View Post
    Depends on the PSU.



    No. Typically the SATA connector at the PSU melts. That's why we saw that as a common problem when people would use SATA for PCIe adapters for cryptocurrency rigs.
    Well, how does OVP, OCP, and OTP fit into that? Aren't those suppose to protect things like that from being destroyed?

    But back to the SATA plug is concerned as far as max current, in the manual for the 550RMX, it says maximum "load" for the 5V rail is is 25 amps and 130 watts. Does that really mean that all of the 5V devices connected to the SATA port(s) can use up to 25 Amps combined?

    I really appreciate your help, Jon.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DWD1961 View Post
    Well, how does OVP, OCP, and OTP fit into that?
    OVP and OCP has nothing to do with connectors melting unless there are short in it, as in, it melts because it heats up because resistance is too high. And OTP works only for temperature inside a PSU, not connectors.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DWD1961 View Post
    Well, how does OVP, OCP, and OTP fit into that? Aren't those suppose to protect things like that from being destroyed?
    It doesn't until the connector melts to the point where hot touches ground and you have a short.

    Quote Originally Posted by DWD1961 View Post
    But back to the SATA plug is concerned as far as max current, in the manual for the 550RMX, it says maximum "load" for the 5V rail is is 25 amps and 130 watts.
    25A X 5V = 125W. Not 130W. The 130W is for the +5V and +3V combined power. That means you can't have a load on the +5V and +3V that exceeds 130W.

    Quote Originally Posted by DWD1961 View Post
    Does that really mean that all of the 5V devices connected to the SATA port(s) can use up to 25 Amps combined?

    I really appreciate your help, Jon.
    It means all of the devices on the +5V (not just SATA) or one device on the +5V can use up to 25A.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jon Gerow View Post
    It doesn't until the connector melts to the point where hot touches ground and you have a short.



    25A X 5V = 125W. Not 130W. The 130W is for the +5V and +3V combined power. That means you can't have a load on the +5V and +3V that exceeds 130W.



    It means all of the devices on the +5V (not just SATA) or one device on the +5V can use up to 25A.

    Ok, that really helps then. I was thinking the 5+ was 5 Amps only. Plenty of power available then for devices. Just have to watch the device amps rating.

    So, interesting the melting sata ports, the plugs will not melt up to 25 amps? I'm still confused if they won't melt up to 25 amps, and there is OCP protecting the circuit, why would they melt if power did not exceed (heat) 25 amps?

    Thanks again. I'm obtaining some very important knowledge here.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DWD1961 View Post
    Ok, that really helps then. I was thinking the 5+ was 5 Amps only. Plenty of power available then for devices. Just have to watch the device amps rating.

    So, interesting the melting sata ports, the plugs will not melt up to 25 amps? I'm still confused if they won't melt up to 25 amps, and there is OCP protecting the circuit, why would they melt if power did not exceed (heat) 25 amps?

    Thanks again. I'm obtaining some very important knowledge here.
    They won't melt on the PSU side. That connector has larger pins that are meant to deliver power to a multitude of SATA connectors on the other end of a cable.

    They melt on the device side.

    There's no "thermal sensor" or "current sensor" on the SATA connector itself. So as long as there is a load, the connector will keep delivering power until eventually it gets too hot and melts.

    The maximum current rating "per rail" for a SATA connector is only 4.5A: http://www.playtool.com/pages/psucon...onnectors.html

    Try to pull more than that and all bets are off.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jon Gerow View Post
    They won't melt on the PSU side. That connector has larger pins that are meant to deliver power to a multitude of SATA connectors on the other end of a cable.

    They melt on the device side.

    There's no "thermal sensor" or "current sensor" on the SATA connector itself. So as long as there is a load, the connector will keep delivering power until eventually it gets too hot and melts.

    The maximum current rating "per rail" for a SATA connector is only 4.5A: http://www.playtool.com/pages/psucon...onnectors.html

    Try to pull more than that and all bets are off.
    Ok that makes sense then about the connector itself. People didn't understand that even though they could get 25 Amps from the SATA rail, their SATA connectors would not handle it. Just to be clear, not only will the divices sata 4.5 amps connector melt, but so too for the included PSU's cable sata plugs becasue they are only rated for 4.5 amps each too?

    There is a reason for my asking all of these question, besides the fact it is just interesting and good knowledge to have.

    I somehow burned out the RGB riser on my motherboard. (Not the ARGB). I cut some strips and soldered them together using wires to fit my case, and then one day things weren't working correctly and I inspected the riser and the fets next to them and they were a mess. I checked the strip that I never soldered on (extra) and did find a loose connection in a section. I didn't test the the rest of it. It would make intermittent contact as I used the DMM and moved the strip around. Anyway, that in itself should not have caused the RGB circuit to draw more than 2 AMps and melt.

    It could have been a bad circuit on the MB or the strips.

    I have no way of really knowing shat happened, as it had to be something that allows more than 2 Amps to flow through the circuit. It could have been a bad resistor on the strip I guess? Anyway, I'm REALLY leery of doing that again without some sort of protection on the RGB risers. I'm also considering using the Corsair Commander or Light Node SATA powered hub/controllers. That way the RGB header and the ARGB header are not in the circuit any longer. If something burns due to over current it would be the commander or light node and connectors/wires (I assume the Commander and L. Node don't have OCP, fuse, etc.).

    However, I really don't need to invest the money for the Commander/L Node, and regardless if my MB is awarded a replacement from Gigabyte or not, I'm going to try the 12V RGB custom strips again.

    So, anyway, I am trying to figure out how to put protection on that circuit, so if something is a dead short or bad resistor or whatever, I don't fry the MB header. I was thinking about an inline 2Amp quick blow fuse/breaker on the 12v+ side. It would be easy to solder up a connector/extension cable coming off the board's riser with a fuse on the 12v+ wire, and I'm currently looking for a 2 Amp resetable circuit breaker. If I can't find that, I'll just use a fuse. Would that work to protect the FETs from overheating? Any suggestions?

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    Quote Originally Posted by DWD1961 View Post
    Ok that makes sense then about the connector itself. People didn't understand that even though they could get 25 Amps from the SATA rail, their SATA connectors would not handle it. Just to be clear, not only will the divices sata 4.5 amps connector melt, but so too for the included PSU's cable sata plugs becasue they are only rated for 4.5 amps each too?
    No. That is exactly NOT what I said.

    Only the SATA connector is rated at 4.5A. The 18g wire and the connector at the PSU should be able to handle the full 25A.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jon Gerow View Post
    No. That is exactly NOT what I said.

    Only the SATA connector is rated at 4.5A. The 18g wire and the connector at the PSU should be able to handle the full 25A.
    Right, but what I meant was the the SATA connectors that come on the 18 gauge wire are rated for 4.5A each? (Not just the device side connector?)

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