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Thread: High failure rate for cold hard drives

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    Default High failure rate for cold hard drives

    The Google survey

    https://static.googleusercontent.com...k_failures.pdf

    shows a high failure rate for cold drives (still way above freezing).

    Any idea what might be causing this? Condensation? and is a similar thing seen for power supplies?
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    I guess it doesn't make much sense since hard drives are sealed. So there should be no moisture to condensate.

    I suppose the viscosity of the bearing lubricant might thicken and eventually cause a failure. But I wouldn't think that would happen in those high of a temperatures.

    PSUs are a whole other issue since the viscosity of the electrolyte change at different temperatures. When we test PSUs, we not only do so at 50C, but also 0C. And we'll typically see more failures (not catastrophic. Just out of spec) at 0C then we do at 50C.

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    As far as I know, only the helium drives are sealed, and I was thinking of condensation affecting connectors and so a possible issue for power supplies also.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ashiekh View Post
    As far as I know, only the helium drives are sealed, and I was thinking of condensation affecting connectors and so a possible issue for power supplies also.
    Well, condensation is clearly going to effect any electronics. None of them like moisture. But even if you test at 0C, 50% R.H., you'll have some failures.

    My bad about HDD's. I always assumed they were sealed (but not in a vacuum) because the platters are so sensitive to contaminants.

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    I believe there is a filter to the outside and a second one inside that catches the air as it circulates.

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    One can see the second internal filter top right
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    Last edited by ashiekh; 2 Weeks Ago at 11:07 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jon Gerow View Post
    Well, condensation is clearly going to effect any electronics. None of them like moisture. But even if you test at 0C, 50% R.H., you'll have some failures.

    I think you are right, the issue is relative humidity
    https://www.zdnet.com/article/heat-d...res-what-does/

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