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Thread: Liquid metal and aluminum

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    Default Liquid metal and aluminum

    Last edited by ashiekh; 4 Weeks Ago at 11:44 AM.

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    Dude used WAY too much. WAY WAY WAY too much. Like the whole syringe.

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    Would you risk a tiny drop knowing what it can do?

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    Quote Originally Posted by ashiekh View Post
    Would you risk a tiny drop knowing what it can do?
    Yes. I've used it. Would use it again.

    Also, just noticed he's using it on an aluminum heatsink. Gallium is known to be Galvanic incompatible with aluminum, as stated in the comments section. Grizzly's documentation says to use it with nickel plated surfaces to avoid this.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jon Gerow View Post
    Yes. I've used it. Would use it again.

    Also, just noticed he's using it on an aluminum heatsink. Gallium is known to be Galvanic incompatible with aluminum, as stated in the comments section. Grizzly's documentation says to use it with nickel plated surfaces to avoid this.

    From Quora
    "
    Gallium reacts with aluminum to form an alloy that is unable to form the tough oxide layer found on pure aluminum. This alloy is therefore quite reactive. For instance, it will react with water, forming hydrogen and aluminum hydroxide and leaving gallium metal.
    "

    i.e. the Gallium is not consumed and can keep attacking no matter how little is present, so I am not at all sure he used 'WAY, WAY, WAY too much'.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_c...ature=emb_logo

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_c...ature=emb_logo
    Last edited by ashiekh; 4 Weeks Ago at 11:22 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ashiekh View Post
    From Quora
    "
    Gallium reacts with aluminum to form an alloy that is unable to form the tough oxide layer found on pure aluminum. This alloy is therefore quite reactive. For instance, it will react with water, forming hydrogen and aluminum hydroxide and leaving gallium metal.
    "

    i.e. the Gallium is not consumed and can keep attacking no matter how little is present, so I am not at all sure he used 'WAY, WAY, WAY too much'.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_c...ature=emb_logo

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_c...ature=emb_logo
    Sure. He might not have used too much. Ok. But he still used it on aluminum, which turned it brittle. Dude CLEARLY didn't read the instructions.

    People don't use Grizzly Kryonaut on Dells with stock coolers. It's pointless. It's made for people with copper cold plates, or nickel plated heatsinks or to go between a delidded CPU's die and IHS.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jon Gerow View Post
    Sure. He might not have used too much. Ok. But he still used it on aluminum, which turned it brittle. Dude CLEARLY didn't read the instructions.

    People don't use Grizzly Kryonaut on Dells with stock coolers. It's pointless. It's made for people with copper cold plates, or nickel plated heatsinks or to go between a delidded CPU's die and IHS.

    Isn't it the Grizzly Conductonaut that is liquid metal? not the Kryonaut; not that it matters much.

    Perhaps the real question is why manufacturers use a paste that seems to age so fast; I don't care for a few degrees here or there, I just want to have to do the job just once.

    I see people saying to 'only use the size of a pea'; for me that is still WAY, WAY too much.
    Last edited by ashiekh; 4 Weeks Ago at 10:14 AM.

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    Yes. A pea is too large.

    I don't know why we're still talking about this.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ashiekh View Post
    Isn't it the Grizzly Conductonaut that is liquid metal? not the Kryonaut; not that it matters much.

    Perhaps the real question is why manufacturers use a paste that seems to age so fast; I don't care for a few degrees here or there, I just want to have to do the job just once.

    I see people saying to 'only use the size of a pea'; for me that is still WAY, WAY too much.

    If you want to have a long-term solution, then look into thermal pads like IC DIamond or Thermal Grizzly's

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    Thermal pads seem expensive

    Super Lube heat sink compound ($7 for 85g) is good to 260C so I assume will last a good long time around 100C
    https://www.super-lube.com/Content/I...k_Compound.pdf

    I'm not concerned with losing 2~3C if the paste lasts.
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    Last edited by ashiekh; 3 Weeks Ago at 03:41 PM.

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