Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 12

Thread: Corsair RM550x - discontinued?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2020
    Location
    California
    Posts
    49
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    0
    Thanked in
    0 Posts

    Default Corsair RM550x - discontinued?

    I just bought a Corsair RM550x from amazon because the 650 STILL isn't in stock. My new rig will never use more than around 380 watts in an unrealistic synthetic stree test, such as Prime 95, etc., so I assume that 550 watts would be enough to"sustain" that sort of load.

    However, I can't find the RM550x on the Corsair website now. Has it been discontinued? I'm thinking about returning the 550 and getting the 650 anyway, as it will be in stock in a couple of days.

    I guess another question is will the RM550x sustain an output of 400 watts?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2020
    Location
    Uzbekistan
    Posts
    83
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    7
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    16
    Thanked in
    14 Posts

    Default

    Corsair RMx got a 'refresh' in 2017\2018, thus, old SKU CP-9020090 were discontinued, replaced with CP-9020177, warranty are still valid (10y for both versions), both are very high performing PSUs, so there's nothing to worry about, keep it, the only difference with 650W model would be in 2 more 6+2-pin PCI-e cables which you don't need unless you're planning to get a second GPU (in which case 650W would be probably a bit of stretch unless it's smth mid-tier). Yes, this PSU can sustain 400W because it's rated for 550W continuous load, at 50C with this specific model.
    Last edited by Juular; 02-25-2020 at 03:01 AM.

  3. The Following User Says Thank You to Juular For This Useful Post:

    Jon Gerow (02-25-2020)

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    jonnyGURU forums, of course!
    Posts
    16,460
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    556
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    391
    Thanked in
    288 Posts

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DWD1961 View Post
    However, I can't find the RM550x on the Corsair website now.
    https://www.corsair.com/us/en/Catego.../CP-9020177-NA

    The high level page only shows three wattages. You have to click on the "RMx" and then you're given the product page with a drop down showing all five wattages.

    It sucks.

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2020
    Location
    California
    Posts
    49
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    0
    Thanked in
    0 Posts

    Default

    Do you think the 550 would be a good match for a system that could use up to 400 watts, or would the 650 be a better match. This rig will be primarily used for playing games. It won't be folding or mining, etc.

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    The Netherlands
    Posts
    5,542
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    387
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    165
    Thanked in
    127 Posts

    Default

    What would be the logic in that?

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2020
    Location
    California
    Posts
    49
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    0
    Thanked in
    0 Posts

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by -The_Mask- View Post
    What would be the logic in that?
    LOL, I know. To give head room for temperatures, cooling, working load, while maintaining peak efficiency and longevity? Running at 400 watts is still only 72% of rated power. I looked at the fan profiles for both the 550 and 650 and the fans both come on about the same time, regardless of the 100 watt difference, so that isn't really an argument either. Even if it ran at 450 watts, that's 80% load.

    What % would you run a power supply at, maximum rated sustained power or give it some head room? I know there area ll sorts of variables to play with, so I don't expect a concrete black and white answer.

    Even if I tack in a power hunger top of the line AMD 5700xt rated at 225watts, my rig's power consumption with everything maxed is 415 watts, and that's being generous.

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2020
    Location
    Uzbekistan
    Posts
    83
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    7
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    16
    Thanked in
    14 Posts

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DWD1961 View Post
    What % would you run a power supply at, maximum rated sustained power or give it some head room? I know there area ll sorts of variables to play with, so I don't expect a concrete black and white answer.
    And again, if PSU are rated for 550W continuous power at 50C that means that it should work fine for at least it's warranty period at 550W load at 50C, and if you actually run it under cooler conditions it would run even longer (way longer, it's non-linear relation), basically, the fan would fail first due to wear anyway unless you would be unfortunate and your unit were with some defect that made it fail earlier, in this case you have 10y warranty that will cover such failures. Even overloading it a bit over specifications should be fine as long you maintain low thermals (i.e your case are well ventilated and you have low-ish ambient temps). And after 10y there are possibility that it might not stand for modern standards for PSUs anyway due to changes in standards for example (like Intel's new 12V only PSU specification).

  9. The Following User Says Thank You to Juular For This Useful Post:

    Jon Gerow (02-26-2020)

  10. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2020
    Location
    California
    Posts
    49
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    0
    Thanked in
    0 Posts

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Juular View Post
    And again, if PSU are rated for 550W continuous power at 50C that means that it should work fine for at least it's warranty period at 550W load at 50C, and if you actually run it under cooler conditions it would run even longer (way longer, it's non-linear relation), basically, the fan would fail first due to wear anyway unless you would be unfortunate and your unit were with some defect that made it fail earlier, in this case you have 10y warranty that will cover such failures. Even overloading it a bit over specifications should be fine as long you maintain low thermals (i.e your case are well ventilated and you have low-ish ambient temps). And after 10y there are possibility that it might not stand for modern standards for PSUs anyway due to changes in standards for example (like Intel's new 12V only PSU specification).

    Thanks again. One thing I think about is although my cases have always been well ventilated, I have always noticed the air coming out is pretty damn warm. I've never measured it, though. So, for instance, you could have an ambient temp (in my case it's never more than 21-24C), but the case temperature is much higher than that. However, since I am now using the Corsair Crytal280, which separates the PSU from the MB and Video card, and has it's own air intake directly outside of the case, that "in case ambient" temperature isn't a concern.

    Thanks for all of your comments. I'm going to keep the 550.

    PS -- John, I did get the refreshed Rm550x (2018).

  11. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2017
    Location
    Grand Junction, CO
    Posts
    2,262
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    133
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    76
    Thanked in
    69 Posts

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Juular View Post
    ... if you actually run it under cooler conditions it would run even longer (way longer, it's non-linear relation) ...

    I seem to recall reading someplace that temperature (within reason) was not a big factor for hard drive life; but this is probably particular to hard drives.

    https://www.zdnet.com/article/heat-d...res-what-does/


    Given the cost of cooling a building, I prefer my power supplies to be able to endure the heat.
    Last edited by ashiekh; 02-26-2020 at 06:53 PM.

  12. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2020
    Location
    California
    Posts
    49
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    0
    Thanked in
    0 Posts

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ashiekh View Post
    I seem to recall reading someplace that temperature (within reason) was not a big factor for hard drive life; but this is probably particular to hard drives.

    https://www.zdnet.com/article/heat-d...res-what-does/


    Given the cost of cooling a building, I prefer my power supplies to be able to endure the heat.
    I'm fortunate that my home cooling in mid summer never exceeds 80 USD. Now, PG&E heating in mid winder is over 130 USD, and that does hurt. Sad that in 2020 power to cool and heat your home is becoming unaffordable for many working families.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •