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Thread: $14.00 Silverstone Fan Hub Uses Capacitor - why?

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    Default $14.00 Silverstone Fan Hub Uses Capacitor - why?

    SilverStone Technology Silverstone 8-Port PWM Fan Hub/Splitter for 4-Pin & 3-Pin Fans in Black SST-CPF04-USA
    Link: https://www.silverstonetek.com/produ...&tb=54&area=en

    This unit comes with a 2200 cap in it. Since it is plugged into an SATA connector, why would they put a cap in it? I'm a little leery of a cap protecting hardware in a 14 dollar product.

    I have an email in to tech at Gigabyte asking how many amps their fin risers can handle. On the board I am going to build with, you only get one CPU and one sys header (ITX board). If the sys fan can handle 2 amps, then I'm not going to use this unit and will get one that is a pass through and use the sys fan header.

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    From that page "2200μF capacitor provides stable voltage"

    Another reason might be to avoid the fans injecting noise back on the line.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ashiekh View Post
    From that page "2200μF capacitor provides stable voltage"

    Another reason might be to avoid the fans injecting noise back on the line.

    Why do you need to stabilize the voltage coming off of a PSU's SATA connection that already has stable voltage? I know there must be a good reason for them having it, all of them that get power from the 5V sata connection do it. However, I'm not an electrician/engineer/technician so I don't really know how the 5V power connectors feed power to each device, depending on what volts and power they need.

    I assume, from reading, that the SATA connector will put out a maximum power (4.5amps) and the connected device will be wired to receive what it needs, 3.3 or 5v.

    But the chassis fans are 12V so, again,I'm assuming in rush current would not be a problem either.

    Sorry about being so clueless about these things, but they do interest me.

    "Noise back into the line": Hhow would that be a problem? That seems really important to me because it that is the case, and the cap fails, then that little 14 dollar module could damage hundreds of dollars worth of equipment?

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    Quote Originally Posted by DWD1961 View Post
    Why do you need to stabilize the voltage coming off of a PSU's SATA connection that already has stable voltage? I know there must be a good reason for them having it, all of them that get power from the 5V sata connection do it. However, I'm not an electrician/engineer/technician so I don't really know how the 5V power connectors feed power to each device, depending on what volts and power they need.

    I assume, from reading, that the SATA connector will put out a maximum power (4.5amps) and the connected device will be wired to receive what it needs, 3.3 or 5v.

    But the chassis fans are 12V so, again,I'm assuming in rush current would not be a problem either.

    Sorry about being so clueless about these things, but they do interest me.

    "Noise back into the line": Hhow would that be a problem? That seems really important to me because it that is the case, and the cap fails, then that little 14 dollar module could damage hundreds of dollars worth of equipment?
    Because more stable is better?

    Honestly, it's a pretty cheap solution. A really expensive fan controller would have DC to DC in it (even though the output is still 12V).

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    Quote Originally Posted by DWD1961 View Post
    "Noise back into the line": Hhow would that be a problem?

    Destabilizing the SATA line could be a problem for other devices on the line...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jon Gerow View Post
    Because more stable is better?

    Honestly, it's a pretty cheap solution. A really expensive fan controller would have DC to DC in it (even though the output is still 12V).
    Hey John, thanks for the reply. I'm more concerned about it being 15 bucks and having the cap go bad and take other things with it. I don't know if that is possible or not. There are other hubs that connect directly to the fan riser, and they do not have caps.


    The fans are Noctua 140mm 1200RPM and if their spec sheet can be trusted, it says max input current is .96 watts and .08 amps. I say "can be trusted" because the exact same model but running at 1500RPM states a whopping .2 amps and 2.4 watts maximum input. I don't know how 300 RPMs can make that much difference.

    140mm 1200RPM Fan Specs: https://noctua.at/en/nf-p14s-redux-1200/specification

    140mm 1500RPM Fan Specs: https://noctua.at/en/nf-p14s-redux-1.../specification

    If I get a reply back from Giagabyte, and the fan riser can handle 2 amps, I may just use a pass though splitter for simplification. Even at 1amp, it would be enough for the fans I want to use, which are the Noctua 1200 RPM, and 7 of those would only be .56 amps. I'd just like to have the extra amps to be safer.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ashiekh View Post
    Destabilizing the SATA line could be a problem for other devices on the line...
    There aren't going to be any other devices on any SATA connector. I'm using an M2 Nvme drive in an M2 drive slot, no CD/DVD, and nothing else. So at least that isn't a problem. And, if I ever do need it, I'll make sure to use another line beside the one on the fan hub.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DWD1961 View Post
    The fans are Noctua 140mm 1200RPM and if their spec sheet can be trusted, it says max input current is .96 watts and .08 amps. I say "can be trusted" because the exact same model but running at 1500RPM states a whopping .2 amps and 2.4 watts maximum input. I don't know how 300 RPMs can make that much difference.

    The power goes as the speed cubed, in which case (15/12)^3 ~ 2; so double the power makes sense.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Affinity_laws
    Last edited by ashiekh; 02-18-2020 at 06:21 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DWD1961 View Post
    Hey John, thanks for the reply. I'm more concerned about it being 15 bucks and having the cap go bad and take other things with it. I don't know if that is possible or not. There are other hubs that connect directly to the fan riser, and they do not have caps.
    The likelihood of that cap going bad is very slim. The likelihood of it going bad and damaging anything is equally slim. The controller would simply stop working.

    Quote Originally Posted by DWD1961 View Post
    The fans are Noctua 140mm 1200RPM and if their spec sheet can be trusted, it says max input current is .96 watts and .08 amps. I say "can be trusted" because the exact same model but running at 1500RPM states a whopping .2 amps and 2.4 watts maximum input. I don't know how 300 RPMs can make that much difference.
    New flash: None of their marketing "can be trusted".

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jon Gerow View Post
    The likelihood of that cap going bad is very slim. The likelihood of it going bad and damaging anything is equally slim. The controller would simply stop working.



    New flash: None of their marketing "can be trusted".
    heh, yeah. I'll use the SS hub then and if I ever get a reply from Gigabyte and the riser is 2A, then i'll jsut plug them into the riser itself with a pass through splitter. You would think that at least the specifications for fan power usage would be accurate.

    Thanks for the info.

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