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Thread: NAS Power Supply Recommendation

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    Default NAS Power Supply Recommendation

    Hi everyone,

    I was looking for a recommendation on power supplies for a 24/7-running NAS, so efficiency at low loads would be nice. A quiet fan or a fan that stops spinning at low loads would be a bonus.

    Location: California (higher power costs)

    CPU: Intel Celeron G4900
    MB: ASRock H370M Pro4
    RAM: 1-2 sticks DDR4 (not yet decided)
    Integrated graphics
    1 SSD
    3 larger (120+ mm) case fans, CPU cooler fan at low speed
    Host Bus Adapter (~10W from what I've read)

    I am planning for 8 HDDs max, which from some research I believe would use ~21W each at startup before idling at lower speeds/wattage. If you have a candidate that would work for 10-12 HDDs, would be open to hearing about it.

    Thanks in advance!

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    Do you have a price limit?

    We could say for you to get a Seasonic Prime Titanium 650w(90.82% @ 10% load) or a Silverstone Strider Titanium 600w(91.81% @ 10% load). They would check your boxes without much fuss. They're also expensive units (~$150).

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    Thanks for the suggestions. Overall price limit is $110 pre-tax, but I'd also be open to any $60-$80 suggestions. Don't want to chase efficiency too hard, power cost here is $0.25/kWh, which while high will never be paid back by efficiency gains over the 6-8 years of use I'm considering.

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    Quote Originally Posted by tontine View Post
    Thanks for the suggestions. Overall price limit is $110 pre-tax, but I'd also be open to any $60-$80 suggestions. Don't want to chase efficiency too hard, power cost here is $0.25/kWh, which while high will never be paid back by efficiency gains over the 6-8 years of use I'm considering.
    The Corsair RM (non X, non I) is made to meet the low load efficiency requirements of the CEC (California Energy Commission).

  5. The Following User Says Thank You to Jon Gerow For This Useful Post:

    GDILord (4 Weeks Ago)

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jon Gerow View Post
    The Corsair RM (non X, non I) is made to meet the low load efficiency requirements of the CEC (California Energy Commission).
    Thank you, this meets every criteria, and better than I was really hoping for!

    Two questions:
    - Do you know if there is a difference between the yellow and black label units? I've read the black labels are newer. Does it matter which I get?
    - Do you think 550W is good enough for 8-10 drives, or should I spring for the 650W to be safe? According to this spreadsheet I've found, I think each hard drive will use ~21W at spin-up, and the remainder of the components are really quite low-power.

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    Quote Originally Posted by tontine View Post
    - Do you know if there is a difference between the yellow and black label units? I've read the black labels are newer. Does it matter which I get?
    Corsair RM with a yellow label is really old (from 2013 till 2016), it shouldn't be available anywhere anymore. So the ones with black label is the one they are talking about.
    - Do you think 550W is good enough for 8-10 drives, or should I spring for the 650W to be safe? According to this spreadsheet I've found, I think each hard drive will use ~21W at spin-up, and the remainder of the components are really quite low-power.
    A high quality 300W PSU should already be enough. However the Corsair RM 2019 starts with 650W.

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    Quote Originally Posted by -The_Mask- View Post
    Corsair RM with a yellow label is really old (from 2013 till 2016), it shouldn't be available anywhere anymore. So the ones with black label is the one they are talking about.

    A high quality 300W PSU should already be enough. However the Corsair RM 2019 starts with 650W.
    Thank you! Are consumer power supplies at close to that wattage still being sold? I recall being able to buy smaller PSUs years ago, but it seems like most a much larger now. It sounds like the Corsair RM is good for me, but if I can get quality at a lower price, I'm happy to lose low-load efficiency (quiet operation would still be appreciated).

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    Quote Originally Posted by tontine View Post
    Thank you! Are consumer power supplies at close to that wattage still being sold? I recall being able to buy smaller PSUs years ago, but it seems like most a much larger now.
    That's because it doesn't cost any less to build a smaller PSU these days.

    Case and point, the actual cost of materials to make an RM750 vs. an RM650 is less than $1.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jon Gerow View Post
    Case and point, the actual cost of materials to make an RM750 vs. an RM650 is less than $1.
    Whaaaat? Wow!

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    Quote Originally Posted by GDILord View Post
    Whaaaat? Wow!
    Yep. You have to not make as much margin on the lower wattage product, or over inflate the price of the higher wattage product to create that $10 MSRP delta. But eventually, you start seeing the product on the street at the same price regardless of wattage.

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