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Thread: AIO liquid cooler

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    Default AIO liquid cooler

    I was wondering what fluid an AIO liquid cooler uses, I assume water with some antifreeze. This relates to a question I have had for a long time, concerning cars.

    We add anti-freeze to the water in a radiator because water expands on freezing and use water as it has a very high specific heat. Now most fluids, anti freeze included, shrink on freezing; so I wonder if anyone knows the concentration that would not expand at all on freezing and so would be safe no matter how cold things got?

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    They don't.

    There have been instances where AIO coolers were stored in cold warehouses in the Nordics and leaked due to expansion.

    While ethylene or propylene glycol is used, the goal is to not "anti-freeze", but to "anti-boil". If the correct ratio is used, you're going to increase the "boiling point" without causing expansion, but you're also going to bring up the freezing point.
    Last edited by Jon Gerow; 12-21-2019 at 02:36 PM.

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    I am surprised that increasing the boiling point is more important that maximizing the heat carrying capacity.
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    Last edited by ashiekh; 12-21-2019 at 03:32 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ashiekh View Post
    I am surprised that increasing the boiling point is more important that maximizing the heat carrying capacity.
    I never said it was more or less important. I don't work on liquid coolers so I don't know.

    I was only referencing your use of the term "anti-freeze" and the fact that water expands as it freezes; merely stating that the "anti-freeze" in AIO's does in fact freeze and at a much higher temperature than the "anti-freeze" in your car.

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    Ah, thanks; I got a little confused for a moment. But for storage purposes the mix that does not expand (on freezing) would also be of interest.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ashiekh View Post
    Ah, thanks; I got a little confused for a moment. But for storage purposes the mix that does not expand (on freezing) would also be of interest.
    Using climate controlled warehouses would be of interest... but you know.... $$$$$

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    To add onto what Jon said, the glycol mixture does lower the thermal capacity and transfer efficiency of the liquid (versus pure H20) but it's effective at raising the boiling point usually above the 125C point as to limit expansion and evaporation. They also do add in a biocide to most AIO mixtures in order to prevent any microbial growth that could potentially happen as well as some kind of corrosion protection as you're mixing an aluminium radiator with a copper block.

    Specific formula mixes are a guarded secret for the most part, so you won't find any good ratios on how to refill an AIO.

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    Don't modern CPUs throttle to keep their temperature at 100C or less?

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    Default AIO liquid cooler

    I also have a question on the sampling rate of the AIO module.

    8ms -> 125Hz. Will this be attainable on all channels if all channels are used, or will I only get 30Hz per channel?

    Thanks.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ashiekh View Post
    Don't modern CPUs throttle to keep their temperature at 100C or less?
    Yes they do throttle, but the temperature is dependent on the series of CPU. 100C is common for some Intel chips, but not all of them. More modern chips like Skylake and it's derivatives (Intel 7, 8, 9, & 10 series) all throttle in the 82-85C range with thermal shutdown occurring around 100-102C. AMD Ryzen CPUs (first and second generation Zen/Zen+) thermal throttle around the 65-70C point with thermal shutdown occurring past the 95C point. Ryzen 3rd Gen (Zen2) chips are less defined as they operate more like a traditional GPU when it comes to clock speed and less like a CPU as it has a higher throttle point (90C) and mostly the same shutdown point (95C) but looses significant boost performance above 60C.

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