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Thread: Is 16 AWG really better than 18 AWG? (SSR-1200PD for Mining)

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    Default Is 16 AWG really better than 18 AWG? (SSR-1200PD for Mining)

    Greetings smart people of JonnyGuru, could you please give me some advice.

    After searching the forums, I can find related information to what I'm asking, for example, a reply by Jon regarding a roughly 200W load melting a PCI-E connector: "Gold plating ain't gonna help. Mining is too much sustained load for a modular connector."
    ..but not a clarification on whether 16 AWG is as much of a benefit as it seems.

    I have a Seasonic Prime 1200W, and the supplied PCI-E cables are 18 AWG. I also have an AMD RX Vega 64 (345W), NV GTX 590 and am planning on getting my friend's R9 295x2.

    Oklahoma Wolf pinged half a point for 18 AWG cabling in the review:
    https://www.jonnyguru.com/blog/2017/...ower-supply/6/

    So I felt compelled to email Seasonic Australia and ask if I can purchase 16 AWG cables, because I intend to use devices that require more than 250W, to which they replied:

    "Seasonic using high power adapter , 18AWG can handle 18A . cable is 8.5A .
    It means no problem for any of our Seasonic Power EVEN 1200w or higher"


    So, after doing some googling, I'm guessing they're wrong about at least the "18A" part, right?
    (https://www.gpuminingresources.com/p/psu-cables.html)

    3 circuits are usually found in PCI-E cables, so if we believe Seasonic's email, 3 x 8.5 would be 25.5A or 306W.

    If we don't believe Seasonic's email, as the cables have an 80C insulation rating, it looks like we've got 6A or 7A per circuit, meaning a total of 252W.

    Also, if the PCI-E connectors are rated for 288W, and some people are melting connectors with around 200W.
    (http://www.jonnyguru.com/forums/show...ighlight=295x2)

    - Then is there really a benefit to having 16 AWG cabling compared to 18 AWG?
    - Am I missing something - like would 18 AWG cable heat up the connector faster than 16 AWG during sustained load?

    Also I'm still learning, to please correct me if I've made any wrong assumptions/calculations.
    Any advice would be much appreciated.

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    As I've said time and time again... the PINS are the weak point.

    Connectors are not melting because the wire gauge isn't large enough. Connectors are melting because the PINS are getting hot and melting the connectors.

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    When connectors suffer heat damage, is it usually those on the power supply (for modular) or those on the motherboard end?

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    Quote Originally Posted by ashiekh View Post
    When connectors suffer heat damage, is it usually those on the power supply (for modular) or those on the motherboard end?
    You asking me?

    99% of the time I see it, it's the connector at the end of the PSU cable (either end).

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    ashiekh (4 Weeks Ago), dj44nz (4 Weeks Ago)

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    I wonder how much silicone oil would help; it keeps the pins from corroding and so maintains a better connection.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ashiekh View Post
    I wonder how much silicone oil would help; it keeps the pins from corroding and so maintains a better connection.
    Assuming the problem is corrosion.....

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    Here is another thought, the thicker gauge will act like a heatsink, removing more heat from a pin?
    Last edited by ashiekh; 4 Weeks Ago at 07:42 PM.

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    Nope. Connector melting/burned . not the cable . when rx470 take to much power from pcie lane. I see a lot of case burn the 12v circuit line in mainboard and sata connector ( if they use a riser)

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    If the problem is the pin, then what is the advantage of using thicker wires?

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    It is just a thought... to conduct heat away. That is how science proceeds... starts with a conjecture which is often wrong.

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