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Thread: A walk through the CWT factory

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    Default A walk through the CWT factory

    So, a few months ago I had the pleasure of walking through a few PSU factories.

    It's not unusual for many of the factories to not allow photography, but CWT was so proud of their new facility (built in 2010), they actually encouraged me to take as many photos as necessary.

    The factory is located in Guanzhou, China. Which is actually a bit unusual in itself since most factories are in Shenzhen. Personally, I find the less hectic and over-developed area of Guanzhou a pleasant break.

    In this first post, I'll take you for a walk down one of the assembly lines...



    In this shot, off to the left, you can see the line of people placing components on the PCB. After they're all situated, a jig, or "fixture" is used to hold everything in place. That's what you see in the below picture, albeit much later on in the assembly process (Note the modular interface and a couple ground wires already in place). After assembly, the PCB goes into a fairly modern wave soldering machine. One of these days, I should send a Go Pro through one of these.



    After going through the wave soldering, the unit is flipped upside down and put in another jig where it is "cleaned" by hand. In the below picture, the young lady is trimming legs that may be too long or excess solder that might hang onto the board. This jig actually has a sliding mechanism that goes back and forth over the PCB. The mechanism is only a few millimeters over the surface, so if anything is too long, it will hit it and the worker knows it's something that needs to be trimmed.



    After this, the PSU is put through some testing to make sure everything functions correctly.



    After the unit passes, it's time for assembly into a housing.



    Once assembled into a housing, the unit is tested again. You'll probably recognize the SM-5500/SM-220 kit up on the shelf. The PSU is clamped down to a vibration table during the load test to make sure that everything is assembled solidly and that nothing rattles loose.


    More later....

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    Default

    I heard or read somewhere, many years ago and I could not find it anymore, that Enermax (I think it was Enermax though) was the first one to come with plastic forms to hold components in place during wave-soldering…maybe after the problems they got with chloroprene glue. Any idea if that's true?

    Anyway, it's good to see them using such things instead of wast amounts of silicone or other stuff…

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    Jonny, What psu model are they making/testing?

    Corsair CXM??

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    Yeah. Those seem to be CX750M's in the pictures.

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    Default

    The second picture looks like a RMi or HXi.

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    Default

    Could be. I took the pics back in November and they're out of sequence on my HDD because I walked up one line and then back down another. So it could be that one was making CX750M and the line next to it were making RM/HX.

    EDIT: Judging by the pictures later on in my set, it looks like they were doing RM750 and RM750i.
    Last edited by Jon Gerow; 03-01-2016 at 06:37 PM.

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    Ok.. Next set of pictures....

    The daughter boards, like the DC to DC or the modular interfaces, etc. are assembled on a different line. They're often assembled two, three or four boards at a time, all on one PCB that is later broken up.









    Since the daughter board only provides DC to DC, a +12V source is used to test the finished product on a load tester.

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    Default

    Cables! Cables! Cables!



    To make sure all of the cables are correct, each one is plugged into a tester that makes sure the pin out is correct.



    Below, we see the burn-in cabinets. All these are are giant, temperature controlled chambers with loads in them. The PSU is hooked up, put at full load and then the temperature is cranked up to 30, 40 or 50°C; depending on the specification of the model.



    Believe it or not, these aren't this isn't the nicest burn-in setup I've seen. For this kind of setup, a worker has to go through and look at the display under each unit to see if it's a pass or fail. Another setup I saw more recently actually has a centralized control center with all conditions (load, temperature, pass or fail, etc.) on a single monitor. The only thing that was missing was a button to press that would eject the PSU out of the cabinet and onto the floor.

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    Default

    After everything is assembled, the PSU is packed into a box, with it's cables, manual and anything else, put into a master carton that holds four to six PSU units (depending on the size of the unit) and then stacked up onto a pallet.





    After that, it's off to the warehouse... right?

    WRONG!



    Before going to the warehouse, each pallet goes past a room where one box is removed from it.



    This box is opened up and inspected to make sure everything is correct. If there are ANY discrepancies to the box, contents, product finish, etc., a camera is used to take pictures and an email is sent up the line to make sure everything stops and the issue resolved.


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    Default

    Nice!

    All the surface mount components are put on by pick and place machines right?

    Where could I get a 12v to 5v dc-dc converter like the one in PSUs. Mind sending me one?

    7805 isn't cutting it anymore :P

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