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Thread: Why is this PSU not recommended

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    Default Why is this PSU not recommended

    Hello everyone,

    Why are the Corsair VS white label series of PSUs not recommended for use in builds?

    Thank you

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    There are better options for the same price and the quality and performance is just low. It's more a PSU to fix an old PC then a PSU for a new machine.

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    The VS is Corsair's cheapest PSU.

    That said, there are cheaper, lesser quality PSUs.

    What makes the VS "cheap"?

    Old topology. Double forward. Any decent PSU made today should have at least an LLC resonant mode topology. This newer topology can handle the high transient loads found in modern graphics cards.

    No DC to DC for the +3.3V and +5V rail. So in certain cross loads or sleep states where the load on one particular "rail" exists, but no load exists on another, the PSU's output can go out of spec.

    Sleeve bearing fan. They don't last long. A sleeve bearing isn't a bearing at all, really. It's just a metal pin through a brass sleeve.

    Inefficient. The more inefficient a power supply is, the more power it uses from the wall and the more heat it generates.

    Rated at 30C. That means if the PSU is operating in an environment higher than 30C, it's not going to be able to output it's full power capability (at least not within spec).

    Old version of VS had a .6mm housing. These would damage easily. Even if you can't see the damage, a good "heave ho" from FedEx could knock something use causing DOA or infant mortality. The new version uses a more common .8mm housing.

    Old version of VS was 230V only. If your mains weren't stable and the voltage dropped below ~180V for longer than your bulk cap can stay charged (hold up time), the PSU would just shut off. Better PSUs can handle mains voltage all the way down to 90V without flinching.

    Keep in mind, that's just the specific issues with a specific model. There are plenty of "brand name" PSUs out there that are just as bad, or worse, than VS....

    EVGA N1. EVGA W1. Cooler Master Elite or Lite.

    So if someone says, "OMG! You shouldn't get the Corsair VS! It's garbage!" and then proceeds to suggest an EVGA W1. They're either stupid or an EVGA shill.

    And then there are PSUs that are EVEN WORSE but we won't get into those. Those aren't even brand names and are often regional because they can't even get certified for use/sale in most countries.

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    Quote Originally Posted by burton View Post
    Why are the Corsair VS white label series of PSUs not recommended for use in builds?
    because the be quiet System Power 9 (400W and up) is way better because it has DC-DC.

    And for just a couple of bucks (~10) you can get something that is soo much better, have a decent quality fan, almost double the warranty, way better voltage regulation and so on.

    Lets stay within the Corsair Lineup: Compare the VS to the CX. Over here the CX is just around 10 more than the VS. And look at what little you have to pay to get THAT MUCH more.

    The Competition offers 80plus Gold for a similar price to the CX...
    Especially if you look at the whole System, the 10 more for the better PSU is just totally worth it, you get so much more!

    If you build a new PC; you can often save a buck or two here and there so that you can easily afford the better PSU...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jon Gerow View Post
    The VS is Corsair's cheapest PSU.
    That said, there are cheaper, lesser quality PSUs.
    What makes the VS "cheap"?
    ...
    Actually this is a quite comprehensive overview of 'why should we use good psus'

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jon Gerow View Post
    Old version of VS was 230V only. If your mains weren't stable and the voltage dropped below ~180V for longer than your bulk cap can stay charged (hold up time), the PSU would just shut off. Better PSUs can handle mains voltage all the way down to 90V without flinching.

    Isn't 'atx spec hold up time' the time that bulk cap can hold when mains are off?
    How is it different from quoted hold up time?(..or same thing?)

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    Quote Originally Posted by rgbodosk View Post
    Isn't 'atx spec hold up time' the time that bulk cap can hold when mains are off?
    How is it different from quoted hold up time?(..or same thing?)
    Hold up time is not linear. The higher the load, the shorter the hold up time. If a PSU meets a spec of 100% load, it's going to have considerably longer hold up time at 25% load.

    If you have 20ms worth of hold up time and the mains drops out completely for 18ms, you're fine. If you have 20ms worth of hold up time and the mains voltage drops from 230V to 180V for < 20ms, then you're fine. But what if the voltage drop lasts more that 20ms? If your PSU can support a full range of input voltages, then nothing happens and the PSU does not rely on the bulk caps' hold up alone to keep the PSU live.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jon Gerow View Post
    But what if the voltage drop lasts more that 20ms? If your PSU can support a full range of input voltages, then nothing happens and the PSU does not rely on the bulk caps' hold up alone to keep the PSU live.
    Depends on the design of the PSU.

    There are "230VAC" PSU that work with less than that - but not at 100% Load or for more than a couple of seconds.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Stefan Payne View Post
    Depends on the design of the PSU.

    There are "230VAC" PSU that work with less than that - but not at 100% Load or for more than a couple of seconds.
    I never said any PSU was "230V only". In fact, if you look at post #3, you'll see I give 180V as an example of a low voltage on a "230V" PSU.

    But like you said, it really varies... and I've seen some scary shit out there. The CWT GPM platform actually has protection that will shut off the PSU if the mains voltage drops too low. While some PSUs like the Thermaltake Smart 230V will run regardless of input voltage despite what the label says. If I have a 75%-100% load on one at 230V and then drop the mains voltage down to 110V, they just blow up instead of shutting down.

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    Then... I wonder why there are 'only 230V' APFC psus?
    What happends when just connecting that to the 110V powergrid(When assuming there is no UVP)? Insufficient component specs? And if(surely) something goes wrong, why that happends?

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