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Thread: PicoBox Unveils Tiny, 56mm Power Supply

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    Default PicoBox Unveils Tiny, 56mm Power Supply

    PC builders who like tiny chassis have a new power supply option that could save them a lot of space. PicoBox has a new line of extra small power supplies (PSUs) this called the PicoBox Z2—and they're seriously small. These little guys measure in at 56mm long, just big enough for its 24-Pin ATX to plug directly into your motherboard.

    The company has released four models, each with more power output than the last. They're available from 120W up to an impressive 250W. This spec chart highlights the features you can expect in the PicoBox Z2 PSU line.

    We're not suggesting you use a power supply like this for your next full ATX desktop build—but it would be perfect for a Mini-ITX build. These were designed with miniature desktops in mind, much like the Geeek A1 Mini-ITX Case we reviewed in August.

    There aren't many PSUs that can fit inside a Mini-ITX case, but PicoBox is certainly up to the challenge. PicoBox ensures performance efficiency up to at least 94%. You can grab a PicoBox Z2 of your own for less than $30 (€27) on the official website.

    If you're looking for a PSU with the smallest possible form factor, this could be your best bet. Not only does it promise serious performance for its size, but its low price makes it budget-friendly.
    https://www.tomshardware.com/news/pi...psu,40425.html

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    The way this news has been posted on every single website, you would think there was no such thing as a PicoPSU before.

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    True.

    They also didn't give it much thought, even the 200W version only has two sata connectors, 4 pins ATX 12V and a 24 pins ATX.

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    But it has 200W!!!1111

    Still not a fan though...
    I rather have a far larger Open Frame unit such as is in my ISK110...

    Quote Originally Posted by -The_Mask- View Post
    They also didn't give it much thought, even the 200W version only has two sata connectors, 4 pins ATX 12V and a 24 pins ATX.
    that isn't even the worst part...
    The Worst part is that they go from the Molex connector (or rather AMP) to the 12V CPU...
    So that means that the CPU COnnector has an additional resistance due to the crimping of the Molex that is totally unnecessary....

    They should have gone for 2 Connectors: One for the CPU Connector, one for the drives...
    Or rather 3: 2 drives, 1 CPU (4-8 pin, for drives 3 pin seems sufficient)...
    Last edited by Stefan Payne; 3 Weeks Ago at 09:41 AM.

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    One still needs a 12V power supply...

    so its cheating a little as only a fraction of the total power is 3.3 and 5V

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    Yeah, basically its a minor rail board...
    The main brick is the other PSU...

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    The other problem is it only accepts up to 12.6V, so one could not use it in a car.

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    You shouldn't use it in a car, because it doesn't regulate the 12V. Instead it just passes through. That's why it can't be used.
    Last edited by -The_Mask-; 3 Weeks Ago at 06:14 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ashiekh View Post
    The other problem is it only accepts up to 12.6V, so one could not use it in a car.
    For car PC's, one needs to use a DC to DC BEFORE the PC. So: DC to DC to DC....

    But if you have to do that, you might as well use a D2D PSU with a wide input range.

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