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Thread: Super Flower LEADEX II Gold

  1. #11
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    apparently the RMi model is set default to multirail. if that is so i think i'll go with that one. just to be picky.

    ........... the hx 750 has multirail option too it seems. and is priced 10$ cheaper than the 750rmi...here.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by adamsleath View Post
    apparently the RMi model is set default to multirail. if that is so i think i'll go with that one. just to be picky.

    ........... the hx 750 has multirail option too it seems. and is priced 10$ cheaper than the 750rmi...here.
    Yes. HX has a single/multiple switch. HXi and RMi has multiple by default that can be shut off in LINK or iCUE.

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  4. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by adamsleath View Post
    Also; is there rail separation on these units, and or the corsair rmx line?
    HXi and RMi have, many others do not...


    Quote Originally Posted by adamsleath View Post
    The answer is: of course not. Single-rail PSUs have the very same protective circuitry described above as do multi-rail CPUs.
    Not entirely true.
    There are Single Rail PSU that omit some protections that all Multi rail PSU have.
    That is, for example, Under Voltage Protection on 12V, for example here:
    https://www.hardwareluxx.de/index.ph...t.html?start=3

    And also no OCP on minor rails (wich is a big problem on Group Regulated PSU, on DC-DC it can be done in the DC-DC Circuit but not always is).
    I heard that EVGA GS 550 and 650W for example just die when minor rails are overloaded...

    So that sentence might only apply to Corsair PSU and not everything on the Market...
    Quote Originally Posted by adamsleath View Post
    When looking at total amperage, Itís also important to remember that when a PSU is installed into a PC, the current is spread among multiple power cables ó to your motherboard, to your peripherals, to your GPU, and so on. [B]Youíll never have a situation where 62 Amps are being drawn across a single power cable.
    Not True either, with modern Systems (that can idle at 1-2A on 12V, if they were to be powered by those rails - wich they are not).

    Its the same argument as Seatbelts in a Car. You don't need it when you drive. You need it however if you experience sudden decceleration.
    In that case a Seatbelt can save your life.
    Its the same with Protection. You don't need it for normal operation. But if something goes wrong or horribly wrong, you absolutely need it.
    There is this Thread:
    https://www.overclock.net/forum/31-p...ulti-rail.html

    And you see that a CPU Connector burned off a Board. He had a strong, single Rail 1600W PSU. IIRC an Ultra one.
    And the Issue in that case was that a MOSFET on the Motherboard died. And in those circuits the resistance of a "dead short" can be high enough for strong, high wattage PSU, to not be detectable by the PSU itself - without Multi Rail.
    Especially for 1000W+ units, its getting really spicey, as we talk about 80A or more.
    A 1200W has 100A on 12V. That is no joke. And 100A at 12V means 0.12Ohms (120mOhm). And with low voltage and high current, the resistance becomes critical and it might not even be possible that a PSU switches off due to resistance of the cables and connectors alone!

    Or in other words: It depends. Normally it should. But sometimes its not. And if you don't have the load, the system idles very low and a short happens, you have a Problem...
    Quote Originally Posted by adamsleath View Post
    I was just wondering if any of the circuit protection components fail in the psu whether a cable can be overloaded with amps and overheat.
    There are pictures of burned PCIe Cables and other stuff all around the Interwebs.
    Especially back in the 7990 Mining days...

    Quote Originally Posted by adamsleath View Post
    Is 62 Amps any less safe than 25 Amps?
    Assume you talk about 12V.
    62A are 744W, 25A are just 300W.
    Remember, that is the minimum power that the PSU can deliver.

    Often PSU can be overloaded up to 40%, wich means 1041.6W for the first and 420W for the second one.
    And that's the probable, maximum power they continuously might be able to deliver - at least for a short while.

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  6. #14
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    Thanks for such a thorough answer.

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