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Thread: Removing capacitors from cables - any test of differences?

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    Im confused now. Does seasonic use some very different capacitors then? I don't know what we even talking about

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    Many power supplies have caps to make the ripple lower from let's say 30mV to 10mV. This isn't useful in real life but looks better in reviews.

    A whole different story is the Seasonic Focus and Asus Strix GTX970 they don't work well with each other. As "fix" Seasonic can send you a special cable with a capacitor attached to it. This is a bigger capacitor than the one used to reduce ripple from 30mV to 10mV. With that bigger capacitor the Asus Strix GTX970 can work stable with a Seasonic Focus. It is however a special cable, not a cable that will be shipped with the PSU.

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    Could that cable capacitor have been moved inside by Seasonic for the same effect?


    Two thoughts come to mind, both relating to high frequency ripple

    * sometimes a small capacitor is run in parallel with a large one because the large capacitor has inductance and so can't deal with high frequency

    * the speed of light limit whereby the capacitor might need to be close to the device


    One 'trick' that is sometimes used is to run two capacitors in parallel rather than one of twice the capacity, because the smaller capacitors will each have a lower inductance and when two equal inductors are connected in parallel the end result has half the inductance.
    Last edited by ashiekh; 08-04-2019 at 11:39 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ashiekh View Post
    Could that cable capacitor have been moved inside by Seasonic for the same effect?


    Two thoughts come to mind, both relating to high frequency ripple

    * sometimes a small capacitor is run in parallel with a large one because the large capacitor has inductance and so can't deal with high frequency

    * the speed of light limit whereby the capacitor might need to be close to the device


    One 'trick' that is sometimes used is to run two capacitors in parallel rather than one of twice the capacity, because the smaller capacitors will each have a lower inductance and when two equal inductors are connected in parallel the end result has half the inductance.
    The capacitor is only really effective the closer to the load it is.

    For example: The stock Corsair cables that puts caps right at the end of the cable shaves about 10mV of ripple off the output. The individually sleeved cables have the caps in the middle instead (exact same caps) and only about 5 to 8mV is shaved off.

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    ashiekh (08-04-2019)

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    Quote Originally Posted by DyndaS View Post
    Im confused now. Does seasonic use some very different capacitors then? I don't know what we even talking about
    We're talking about two different things.

    Some cables have caps in them to reduce ripple.

    Some cables have caps in them to store energy to smooth out the output so the PSU doesn't latch from OPP.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jon Gerow View Post
    Some cables have caps in them to store energy to smooth out the output so the PSU doesn't latch from OPP.

    In this case I guess one could move this capacitor into the supply itself, but after the OPP detection.
    Last edited by ashiekh; 08-05-2019 at 09:54 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jon Gerow View Post
    The capacitor is only really effective the closer to the load it is.

    For example: The stock Corsair cables that puts caps right at the end of the cable shaves about 10mV of ripple off the output. The individually sleeved cables have the caps in the middle instead (exact same caps) and only about 5 to 8mV is shaved off.

    So I guess this is due to voltage drop in the cable itself.
    Last edited by ashiekh; 08-05-2019 at 09:55 AM.

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