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Thread: Seasonic m12ii 520 EVO good enough in 2019?

  1. #11
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    Botton line:
    Those units got DBB/FDB bearings.
    most of budget units don't.
    and they got quality reputation because they last for 5+ years (most of them) i got 8-9 years s12ii 620w.
    With the same mobo, hdd.
    and that common for that line.
    I wouldn't buy it for new, like any other group regulation.

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    Quote Originally Posted by none77 View Post
    and they got quality reputation because they last for 5+ years (most of them)
    Many other "named Brand" units do that as well...
    And, as said many times, we do not know the RMA/Failure rates.
    So why claim to know something about that?

    Units fail and some do not, in the end it comes down to luck anyway...

    Quote Originally Posted by none77 View Post
    i got 8-9 years s12ii 620w.
    I got older units than that.
    For example the CWT PSH I have (Hiper Type R I think, 680W), Silverstone Zeus 650W...
    Still working.
    Also the ~10 Year old Cougar 400W I got for Review. Still working (I presume).
    So what?

  3. #13
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    I think that unit got good build quality.
    If those units last (and the components), that approve it. from what you are writing it's looks that it a generic unit that will blow your computer. again, i would not buy this unit now, but i will not buy another group regulation, or horizontal sleeve bearing either.
    I really thing that seasonic minimum standard is above most of their competition.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by none77 View Post
    I think that unit got good build quality.
    I think only Seasonic and Engineers can really say anything about that.
    We End-Users can only guess.
    And here, most are blinded by the capacitors and only see that.
    ANd think that because of the capacitors, the build quality must be awesome.
    Even if there is not necessarily a correlation between caps and Build Quality.

    Quote Originally Posted by none77 View Post
    If those units last (and the components), that approve it.
    If that is the case.
    The thing is that we do not know that.
    Only Seasonic knows that.
    But what you see in some Repair Forums like Badcaps is that if it fails, its usually the PFC Section.
    Or maybe the 5VSB Chip explodes...


    Quote Originally Posted by none77 View Post
    I really thing that seasonic minimum standard is above most of their competition.
    I don't. Because if that was the case, they wouldn't have used a HY-510N as Protection Chip.
    And some of their units wouldn't die in Overload Tests because you forgot OCP in the DC-DC section....

    Nobody is above the rest.
    Everybody has access to the same parts at roughly the same prices.
    So every PSU is a compromize.
    If you want something good for a low price, you can't do it with Japanese Caps (made in China) and a decent fan.
    Something good for low price is for example a Xilence Performance X. (and/or the A+ as well).

    Nobody has the magic sauce (well, except for DELTA because they do their own ASICs), everyone is the same as there is no other way!
    You can take a couple of shortcuts here and there to do what you want - for example rating the PSU at 30°C - but in the end, the lower the Price, the more compromizes you have to do to make a PSU...
    Or you can make the PSU 230VAC only, that gives you a ton of headroom for other stuff.

    But you can't have it all for the 500W @ 50€ range...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Stefan Payne View Post
    tiny heatsinks...
    Fair point, but I was mainly interested in the FDB fan as opposed to the Sleeve on the VS, in combination with the overall better electolytics.

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    The “FDB” fan is likely to be a rifle bearing, or even sleeve bearing, unless someone has cut one open I wouldn’t trust Seasonic.
    Just some nerd from 'Straya

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    Quote Originally Posted by awesomegamer919 View Post
    The “FDB” fan is likely to be a rifle bearing, or even sleeve bearing, unless someone has cut one open I wouldn’t trust Seasonic.
    Why wouldn't you trust them? They put San Ace fans in their X-series. Those San Ace are top-notch fans.
    CPU: Core i7 8700k, HT enabled, all 6 cores OC'd to 4.8GHz, Vcore = 1.24v
    Heatsink: Noctua NH-D15 with one NF-A15 1500 RPM PWM fan
    Motherboard: Gigabyte Z370X Aorus Gaming 7
    RAM: 4x16GB (64GB) Corsair Vengeance LPX DDR4 RAM 16-18-18-36@3200MHz, Vdimm = 1.35v
    GPU: MSI GeForce GTX 1080 DirectX 12 with 8GB 256-Bit GDDR5X
    SSD1: Samsung 840 EVO 500GB TLC; SSD2: SAMSUNG 860 EVO 1TB 3-bit MLC
    HD: WD 500GB (old); Case: LIAN LI PC-7H Aluminum ATX Mid Tower
    PSU: Seasonic Platinum 660W

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by ehume View Post
    Why wouldn't you trust them? They put San Ace fans in their X-series. Those San Ace are top-notch fans.
    Because, unless they have a skilled engineer on staff then they could get duped by the Fan OEM into taking an inferior product. I've had a similar discussion with a few companies in the past and had to explain why their product did not qualify as an FDB as it didn't even match all the requirements of the patent.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tator Tot View Post
    Because, unless they have a skilled engineer on staff then they could get duped by the Fan OEM into taking an inferior product. I've had a similar discussion with a few companies in the past and had to explain why their product did not qualify as an FDB as it didn't even match all the requirements of the patent.
    So what must reviewers do? Cut apart the fans?
    CPU: Core i7 8700k, HT enabled, all 6 cores OC'd to 4.8GHz, Vcore = 1.24v
    Heatsink: Noctua NH-D15 with one NF-A15 1500 RPM PWM fan
    Motherboard: Gigabyte Z370X Aorus Gaming 7
    RAM: 4x16GB (64GB) Corsair Vengeance LPX DDR4 RAM 16-18-18-36@3200MHz, Vdimm = 1.35v
    GPU: MSI GeForce GTX 1080 DirectX 12 with 8GB 256-Bit GDDR5X
    SSD1: Samsung 840 EVO 500GB TLC; SSD2: SAMSUNG 860 EVO 1TB 3-bit MLC
    HD: WD 500GB (old); Case: LIAN LI PC-7H Aluminum ATX Mid Tower
    PSU: Seasonic Platinum 660W

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by ehume View Post
    So what must reviewers do? Cut apart the fans?
    You don't always need to cut, as you can sometimes take the bearing apart without cutting anything. Once you break that seal on an FDB the fan pretty much becomes useless unfortunately, but most fan OEM's just use the same model number for sleeve bearing as they do a Rifle, FDB, or HDB.
    You can also talk to an engineer or product manager at the company; they can sometimes supply appropriate documentation to show how they source the fan and the proper technical diagrams to show it's a proper FDB.

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