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Thread: Corsair RM750x 2018 Review

  1. #11
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    Thank you, I was always wondering how is it possible some PSUs have stated they turn on fan at...let's say 50%, I was always wondering that how do they get along without an additional temperature-based control.

    If I am 100% honest, for me, dual-ball bearing is even worse and much more of a time bomb for me as that thing will work, but the bearing will go bad and there will be a disturbing noise.

    With the Corsair's warranty and a semi-passive mode I have no worries it will survive 10 years, but depending on a life expectancy, what happens then? When will it run out of lubricant? And yes, I do not have to really care about it, I doubt I will have it in 10 years.

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    I think retiring a PSu after 10-12 years of service makes sense. Future platforms will have different requirements anyway at some point.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by dropadred View Post
    Thank you, I was always wondering how is it possible some PSUs have stated they turn on fan at...let's say 50%, I was always wondering that how do they get along without an additional temperature-based control.

    Most units have OverTemperatureProtection as well as some kind of thermal diode which will force the fan on if the internal temperature gets hot enough, even if it's below the 50% threshold.


    Quote Originally Posted by dropadred View Post
    If I am 100% honest, for me, dual-ball bearing is even worse and much more of a time bomb for me as that thing will work, but the bearing will go bad and there will be a disturbing noise.

    2BB is probably one of the most robust and durable bearing types out there. There's a reason it's used in pretty much every industrial application. It will never be as quiet as the sleeve bearing based derivatives but a 2BB is going to take 10+ years to go bad unless you decide to use your PSU as a flail or the fan control decides to way over volt the bearing (14v+)


    Quote Originally Posted by dropadred View Post
    With the Corsair's warranty and a semi-passive mode I have no worries it will survive 10 years, but depending on a life expectancy, what happens then? When will it run out of lubricant? And yes, I do not have to really care about it, I doubt I will have it in 10 years.

    Like Philip said, it's pretty logical to retire a unit after 10 years. I had a Corsair VX550 that was 10 years old a few years back and I finally retired it and replaced it with a RMx550. Both of those units were run "hard" for their lifetime in that they were on almost 24/7 in constant use with a high end machine: Q6600 / 8800 Ultra > i7 960 / HD6970 > Core i7 4770K / 780Ti > 4770K / 980 Ti


    The unit still ran perfectly fine but it was definitely time.

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    Some great points, thank you for such information. I like it.

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