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Thread: Cooler Master Real Power Pro 1000W PSU 10 Year Redux

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spectre View Post
    Would you have guessed that unit would have survived that long? LOL
    The term "they don't build them like they used to" comes to mind.

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    Want it to last 'forever', use a linear supply...

    Perhaps part of the 'problem' is that we keep adding complexity for greater efficiency, but sometimes at the price of longevity.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ashiekh View Post
    Want it to last 'forever', use a linear supply...

    Perhaps part of the 'problem' is that we keep adding complexity for greater efficiency, but sometimes at the price of longevity.
    Linear supplies won't last forever - your reference voltages will still drift. You still need smoothing caps for a linear supply, and the additional heat from a linear supply would probably wear the caps out faster.



    Thinking about it...
    If someone builds a psu with a LTZ-1000 as a reference, that'd be a sweet power supply, obviously designed properly (to make that worthwhile, shielding and proper signal routing would definitely be a must.)

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    You bring up an interesting point, how to make a DC supply without any capacitors. One proof of concept thought is to use 3 phase electricity and combine the rectified outputs which added together would vary between 87 and 100% of the maximum voltage; a regulator could then operate below 87%. A circuit with inductors might do even better; we are just trying to avoid capacitors.

    I don't think precision voltage is very important for a computer power supply as most of the time it is just used as an energy source for a buck converter on the mother board.
    Last edited by ashiekh; 03-13-2018 at 08:02 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by turkey3_scratch View Post
    When you do load tests, do you generally switch it from 75% to 100% immediately, causing a transient, or do you slowly increase it from 75% to 100%? If the latter, do you happen to know at about what percentage it shut off at? If it was to shut off at 78% load, that'd be a significant detail versus if it shut off at 97% load.
    It is an immediate 75% to 100% switch via the programmed loads.

    Quote Originally Posted by Tator Tot View Post
    Forgot to ask Paul, but did you look inside the unit, how bad were the dust bunnies?
    This unit was cleaned every few months since it was in the office and we had to smack the unit because of the fan noise.

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    Since we are considering ancient PSU's, how is the Olympia doing?
    CPU: Core i7 8700k, HT enabled, all 6 cores OC'd to 4.8GHz, Vcore = 1.24v
    Heatsink: Noctua NH-D15 with one NF-A15 1500 RPM PWM fan
    Motherboard: Gigabyte Z370X Aorus Gaming 7
    RAM: 4x16GB (64GB) Corsair Vengeance LPX DDR4 RAM 16-18-18-36@3200MHz, Vdimm = 1.35v
    GPU: MSI GeForce GTX 1080 DirectX 12 with 8GB 256-Bit GDDR5X
    SSD1: Samsung 840 EVO 500GB TLC; SSD2: SAMSUNG 860 EVO 1TB 3-bit MLC
    HD: WD 500GB (old); Case: LIAN LI PC-7H Aluminum ATX Mid Tower
    PSU: Seasonic Platinum 660W

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    Quote Originally Posted by ashiekh View Post
    You bring up an interesting point, how to make a DC supply without any capacitors. One proof of concept thought is to use 3 phase electricity and combine the rectified outputs which added together would vary between 87 and 100% of the maximum voltage; a regulator could then operate below 87%. A circuit with inductors might do even better; we are just trying to avoid capacitors.

    I don't think precision voltage is very important for a computer power supply as most of the time it is just used as an energy source for a buck converter on the mother board.
    My professor all capacitors can be replaced with inductors combined with op amps and all inductors can be replaced with capacitors combined with op amps. Though he didn't go into detail of how you exactly do it. But if this method was done, it seems to me like the workaround for eliminating all capacitors, while entirely possible, would probably increase the cost significantly since op amps are not cheap or drop efficiency.

    Then again, that's just one way. I'm not familiar with your proposed method but it sounds good, too.

    Now, if we could eliminate capacitors and use a lead-based solder, that would probably be a power supply that would last a loooong time.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ehume View Post
    Since we are considering ancient PSU's, how is the Olympia doing?
    It got recycled, so who knows.

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