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Thread: mainboard + PSU combo: how much lifespan left?

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    Question mainboard + PSU combo: how much lifespan left?

    k so I bought an old secondhand rig cause the guy who was upgrading to a kabylake was selling his old one at a really tempting bargain (heck the 2 Ripjaws on that rig alone are worth like more then half the price)

    I bought it fully aware of all the components that make it up as well as the age (he used it for over 4 years inc. lots of gaming. plus he had that 'turbo boost' shit on which is basically a euphemism for 'overclocking')
    so I knowingly took the risk cause he was practically giving it away

    PSU: Cooler Master GX-Lite 600W
    only 1 review for this one, says that voltage regulation is mediocre & ripple control is also mediocre ~90mv (tho still within legal ATX limits)
    I intend to replace that PSU with a better one of cos (my Seasonic)

    Mobo: Asus P8H77-V LE
    it has all-solid caps but they're from china/taiwan so non-jap plus it got only 4 VRMs (4+2 actually but I reckon the 2 is irrelevant right?)

    now iirc Ripple is the main mobo killer right?
    and I read that ripple can kill even the best solid caps out there (and the ones on that mobo ain't even the best (Apaq))

    so question for you experts: how much damage been done by that PSU on that mobo (and the CPU, which is an ivy bridge i5 quad core) and how long can I expect to use it before it kicks?



    ps. for the smartasses who gonna inevetably pop up ^^ I'm all for free speech so u can post whatever shit you feel like as long as you also gimme some serious helpful answers
    Last edited by cossack; 02-02-2017 at 09:54 PM.

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    Since ripple is within spec, there is no need to worry about that.

    And known solid capacitors are fine, Japanese or not. And number of VRM phases on mobo isn't that important, especially if it doesn't support user overclocking.

    IOW, I see no reason to worry unless you're having explicit issues.

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    but for the specs ripple limits are kinda arbitrary right?
    that's why when they review a PSU reviewers always add extra points if the ripple is below half or quarter or a tenth of the limit - there gotta be a reason for that right? (suggests higher ripple shortens life even if within specs?)

    and for the VRMs I don't intend to overclock but the cpu is still a quad and I read that when there's very few VRMs they tend to overheat even without overclocking is that true?
    and the SOBs who designed this board only put 4 VRMs for the CPU which is suppose to be not good
    so how do I limit the overheating of the VRMs eg. when gaming?


    anyway I did some tests (prime95 & memtest) everything seems stable but I just realized I did those tests with that old PSU still in place so basically I stressed the rig using that PSU (maybe I should've put the better PSU before running those tests? else dunno how much more damage I caused)

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    If ripple is in spec, you will more than likely retire computer for other reasons well before it would wear components out. All VRM capacitors on mobo are rated to easily handle any ripple that is within ATX spec for years to come. Otherwise RMA rates would be through the roof and word would spread out.

    Not to mention you are probably nowhere near full load anyway, unless you have bonkers GPU.

    and for the VRMs I don't intend to overclock
    To make it clear, you cannot OC on this mobo, even if you wanted to.

    the cpu is still a quad
    So? Is it on a CPU supported list or not? If it is, that means VRM is easily adequate to handle it, otherwise it would be flagged as not supported.

    What makes you think your VRM is overheating? Have you measured VRM temps? Do you have tower CPU cooler or horizontal one? Have you experienced CPU throttling, while CPU temps seemed OK?

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    no actually the gpu that came with that rig is a very low end kepler gpu I might try to sell it (gainward GT 630)
    but it's the CPU I'm concerned about since it's a quadcore which means heat & since the heatsink cooler is only a stock intel (I intend to replace the heatsink) that means it must've heated quite a bit over the years & heated the nearby VRMs too right?

    Quote Originally Posted by rafal_iB_PL View Post
    What makes you think your VRM is overheating? Have you measured VRM temps? Do you have tower CPU cooler or horizontal one? Have you experienced CPU throttling, while CPU temps seemed OK?
    no its just that its common knowledge that few VRMs = high VRM temperature right?
    also no way of knowing VRM temps cause no VRM sensors (does any board have sensors for VRMs? should be compulsory especially if there's few VRMs)


    btw no throttling cause I always disable Speedstep (never worked well in my experience like it sometimes downclocks during gaming or divx encoding when I need full CPU power)
    I also disable Turbo
    for power saving I only have C-states enabled

    for power management there's also a phase setting but no idea what setting to use to save power without affecting performance (there's an 'extreme' setting which is suppose to enable all VRMs so maybe this means the workload will be always spread across all VRMs? so less heat for each VRM??)

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    Nothing to worry about.

    Why do you disable Turbo boost if you need "full cpu power"? It'll help cut time down on encoding... Turbo boost is no problem for reliability, provided your cpu stays cool.

    Sometimes stock coolers are better than aftermarket coolers, since they actually move air near the vrms, some coolers (especially AIO's) don't.

    no its just that its common knowledge that few VRMs = high VRM temperature right?
    Not really, while it is true that more VRM's in parallel can help, 4 is plenty for a non OC'able board. It's the quality of the VRM's (fets etc) that matter. Most VRM's can easily take 100 degrees celsius or more without a sweat, but you can always touch the heatsink/vrm while it's running and judge whether it is running cool enough for your application.



    EDIT: Going back to your question. I say indefinitely. Until something on your motherboard fails / psu fails, that pc is gonna work until you throw it away/recycle it/sell it
    Last edited by ridgid13579; 02-03-2017 at 12:02 PM.

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    on my previous CPUs my cooler was always way more effective then the stock one
    it's a Zalman (those weird omega-shape ones, with heatpipes)

    I disable turboboost cause it's basically overclocking right?
    I mean if intel sells a 3ghz cpu & the turbo-boost goes up to say, 3.3ghz, why won't intel simply rate their cpu @ 3.3ghz? simple, cause the cpu's rated to safely operate @3ghz so 3ghz it must be else they'd advertise it as a 3.3ghz CPU
    I mean turbo doesn't just increase the clock it also increases Vcore! *_* (and I know overvolting is way more dangerous then overclocking you can't fully "compensate" for the damage of increased voltage not even with watercooling)

    now if my mobo had more VRMs maybe I'd try turbo

    Quote Originally Posted by ridgid13579 View Post
    Not really, while it is true that more VRM's in parallel can help, 4 is plenty for a non OC'able board. It's the quality of the VRM's (fets etc) that matter.
    k so how can I find out what quality & brand the VRMs on this mobo? there's no markings on the VRMs just numbers it says R68 on them

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    I think you're mistaking the VRMs for the inductors. The VRM is the entire thing (cap, inductor and FET). The fet is usually a tiny black chip under the heatsink.

    It's within factory limit's that it's allowed, you're not breaking any spec (or they are, not either).

    You gotta measure your temps before you can draw a good conclusion.

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    Quote Originally Posted by cossack View Post
    I disable turboboost cause it's basically overclocking right?
    No, it's a power saving and thermal management measure, which cuts the processing power when you don't need it.


    Quote Originally Posted by cossack View Post
    I mean turbo doesn't just increase the clock it also increases Vcore!
    But that's always true also for any not Turbo frequency: you don't get/need the same vcore at (to say) 800MHz and at (to say) 2800MHz, even when that 2800MHz is actually NOT a turbo clock.

    Again, it's a power saving measure.
    Best, Luca

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    Quote Originally Posted by ridgid13579 View Post
    I think you're mistaking the VRMs for the inductors. The VRM is the entire thing (cap, inductor and FET). The fet is usually a tiny black chip under the heatsink.

    It's within factory limit's that it's allowed, you're not breaking any spec (or they are, not either).

    You gotta measure your temps before you can draw a good conclusion.
    I meant those small sugarcube-size black "cubes" that surround the cpu socket (there's only a few on low-end boards & many on high-end ones I was told that's how u can tell between low-end & high-end boards)
    those black cubes are the VRMs?

    anyway I checked the cpu temp on desktop idle it's around 40°C (in winter and the room ain't even that warm maybe 20°C) I don't like that temp so gonna have to replace that crappy intel heatsink asap


    Quote Originally Posted by quest for silence View Post
    No, it's a power saving and thermal management measure, which cuts the processing power when you don't need it.
    so it's like speedstep?
    I once read that speedstep decreases cpu clock (in theory only when cpu power not needed) and turbo increases cpu clock (when cpu power needed) so they sound like opposites or something



    anyway since I disable both speedstep & turbo, I only enable C-states
    in speedfan I noticed that with C-states the Vcore drops during idle)

    problem is Vcore goes back to normal during intensive CPU use so instead of C-states I'm trying to find out if I can set the Vcore to a fixed but lower voltage to prolong cpu life even more (so that Vcore will remain lower then default even during gaming without the system going unstable)

    basically I wanna undervolt the cpu as much as possible is there a quick way to find out what's the lowest stable fixed Vcore setting?

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