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Thread: FSP's blog about Transient Response

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    Default FSP's blog about Transient Response

    Gamers are placing increasing demands on computer hardware now. Yet they fail to ensure their power supplies’ capacity in meeting operation requirements exerted by scores of high power consumption components working at the same time. A lot of gaming scenes processing and effects design now mandate advanced graphic card for game software to run smoothly. However, this advanced hardware is not required to run at their peak performance throughout the gaming process or at each and every level. That is, they are frequently switching between different performance modes all the time, which in turn, means transient load changes.

    Electronic circuits of power supplies are designed with a feedback system for immediate adjustment or compensating output back to within standard output voltage specification. This is aimed at preventing the computer system from abnormal operation or damaging other power receiving components due to over- or under-output voltage by transient load changes. There is an industry standard testing “responses over transient load changes” as it is a critical electric indicator for power supply. The goal is to ensure power supplies’ normal operation under different transient load changes.

    FSP has created a standard to take care of this issue in retail products for pundit gamers. Tables below are specification adopted by FSP and Intel. Regarding + 12V products, FSP adopts averages of standards by Intel as FSP retail ones usually come with single + 12V output. Other than this product category FSP employs a stricter output standard compared with Intel.

    Intel standard


    FSP’s enterprise standard


    You may wonder how is response to transient load shown in an oscilloscope. See the charts below of tests by our last flagship model with capacity at 650W for your own reference.

    1. +3.3V output wave


    2. +5V output wave


    3. +12V output wave


    4. -12V output wave


    5. +5Vsb output wave


    How can we make sure given electric specifications are compliant with gamer demands when the standard is always ignored by the public and most media lack of professional equipment for testing the standard? Fortunately there are some professional watchers including HardOCP, Tom’s Hardware, and Techpowerup who keep testing this item in professional manner and highlight suppliers failed to comply.
    Source: http://blog.fsp-group.com/en/transient-response/

    Other blogs from FSP:
    The Importance of Hold Up Time
    Noise Design Requirements for Power Supplies
    The Importance of Inrush Current Limiting
    Thermal Stress Test
    For more see "related" under every blog

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    Would this be related to the PWM controller, how quickly it reacts to the transient load and regulates the voltage back to normality?

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    Sooner or later, Jeremy (*and Paul as well) should upgrade his (*their) equipment.
    I realise that this could be a financial headache, but the fact is that Aris has set new standards at the PSU review field, as he uses state of the art testing equipment.
    At this moment, i have to admit, that i won't buy any PSU unless it is being reviewed by Aris first!! His new Power_OK tests are vital in my opinion!!

    P.S. Pavel also uses Power_OK tests as well, and i believe that all the other reviewers should follow Aris's & Pavel's example.
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    Upgrading the equipent will be simply impossible for most reviewers. The revenue with psu reviews is simply not big enough to justify any adiitonal investments.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Philipus II View Post
    Upgrading the equipent will be simply impossible for most reviewers. The revenue with psu reviews is simply not big enough to justify any adiitonal investments.

    Be sure that i realise this very well, but on the other hand, as a customer, i would hate to pay few hundred dollars/euro, for a PSU, and to discover later that it could be damaging my hardware due to its deviations between Hold-up time & Power_OK time
    P.S. And some donation project could have been made, just like Pavel did at his site
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    Looking at the OP, specifically in the 1st two tables. Except for 12V2, it looks like Intel is specifying a lower trigger point than FSP.
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    Quote Originally Posted by sith'ari View Post
    Be sure that i realise this very well, but on the other hand, as a customer, i would hate to pay few hundred dollars/euro, for a PSU, and to discover later that it could be damaging my hardware due to its deviations between Hold-up time & Power_OK time
    P.S. And some donation project could have been made, just like Pavel did at his site
    Your hardware isn't going to suffer any damage in that scenario since the issue relates to the time the power good signal is sent to the board vs the time that the unit is actually outputting power properly.

    In this circumstance, the issue arises that you're sending too little power to the system for a few ms longer than what's recommended.

    It would be a different case if OPP, OTP, or OCP were not functioning properly.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tator Tot View Post
    Your hardware isn't going to suffer any damage in that scenario since the issue relates to the time the power good signal is sent to the board vs the time that the unit is actually outputting power properly.

    In this circumstance, the issue arises that you're sending too little power to the system for a few ms longer than what's recommended.

    It would be a different case if OPP, OTP, or OCP were not functioning properly.

    This is what Pavel wrote at his Zalman ZM750-EBT review:
    ( http://www.hardwareinsights.com/wp/zalman-zm750-ebt/6/ )
    Originally Posted by Behemot
    The power good signal hold-up time is very long, 19.3 ms. Why is this when voltage hold-up time is so short? This is in violation of the ATX specification as the power good signal must drop out first, then the voltage. Otherwise the components will be told to stay on while they are not provided with sufficient operating voltage, and their current draw can ostensibly rise to a very high level in order to compensate. This is especially the case of DC-DC VRM designs, and hard drive motor regulators will suffer greatly.
    And while Pavel was talking for a 9ms difference between Hold-UP Vs Power_OK, at the Sama Forza T 800, this difference is 23,2ms

    P.S. And i would like to repeat that it's not in my character to take risks, even more if we are talking about unnecessary risks (*i can find other PSUs that don't have this dissadvantage, EVGA T2 / Corsair RMx etc for example)
    Last edited by sith'ari; 04-06-2016 at 04:14 AM.
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    Where has my previous post gone?
    Best, Luca

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