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Thread: 220v to 110v conversion mod

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    Default 220v to 110v conversion mod

    Hi
    I have a power supply that is labeled to work only at 200-240 volts.
    I saw this YouTube video showing how to convert a power supply from 220 to 110.
    But that was for a non active PFC unit.

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=WV0QBWMe9k4

    Is there a way to this for a power supply with active PFC?
    Last edited by Temp1234; 03-29-2016 at 07:06 PM.

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    It's not so simple. You need to check, if primary components (like bridge rectifier) can handle enough current to do rated power @110V. Remember that with halving voltage current at least doubles for the same power (at least, because power losses also increase with current).

    Other than that APFC circuitry in itself can adapt to lower voltage.

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    Temp1234 (03-29-2016)

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    Hi, thanks for the reply.

    I have checked the rectifier (at least that is what I think it was)

    It was GBU406
    http://www.jameco.com/1/1/35315-gbu4...-case-gbu.html

    here are pictures of the unit.
    Do you have any suggestions to getting this unit to work with 110v.




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    You might also need a beefier PFC coil. Because it mustn't saturate with the higher current and it must be able to dissipate the power, because the power increases with the squared current. Moreover it doesn't end with this two components, every input filter, PFC MOSFET & diode and the bulk cap will be stressed more.
    Also the PFC circuitry could prevent the power supply from starting because of too low input voltage..

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    Temp1234 (03-30-2016)

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    Right off the bat GBU406 can only handle up to 4A. So accounting for efficiency losses down the road don't count on more than 300-320W from this unit @110V, if it runs.

    Other components as above noted, may also not be up to snuff, but given what I've typically seen in such PSU, it's quite unlikely. It's entry level FSP PSU, and FSP's builds are not THAT bad.

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    Thanks for the info

    I tried plugging in the power supply to a 110 volt supply.
    It doesn't turn on.
    I think, as mentioned before, the PFC circuit is stopping the unit from turning on.
    But I do get +5vsb.

    My question is: on dual voltage power supplies the voltage switch basically doubles the voltage from 110 input to 220.
    Is there away to add the voltage doubler by soldering extra line or parts?

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    You could try to fool the APFC IC's UVP (yay acronyms!), if possible.

    Pardon my ignorance, but what PSU is that? Rafal was observant enough to spot the "SPI" markings on the transformer and PCB indicating Sparkle Power = FSP, but I can't tell which one exactly it is

    The APFC controller may well be under the heatshrink on that vertical daughterboard in the primary area, which would be somewhat unfortunate, but knowing the exact PSU model may help with figuring out how its APFC is detecting that the input voltage is too low.
    Careful what you wish for... You just might get it.

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    Temp1234 (03-30-2016)

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    Default

    Looks like FSP APN, the 230V version of EPN, 500W version or something like that I guess. So the FSP500-60APN.

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    Hi

    It it's a rebranded FSP unit, lableled as 430 watt.

    http://www.green-case.com/products/p...odel=gp430a_sp

    Closest model is
    FSP450-60APN

    Do you guys know what circuit or wiring I would have to modify to get the input voltage doubled.
    Since this is what universal power supplies do internally.

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    What would happen if he plugged it into his dryer outlet? After all, that socket is 220V.
    CPU: Core i7 8700k, HT enabled, all 6 cores OC'd to 4.8GHz, Vcore = 1.24v
    Heatsink: Noctua NH-D15 with one NF-A15 1500 RPM PWM fan
    Motherboard: Gigabyte Z370X Aorus Gaming 7
    RAM: 4x16GB (64GB) Corsair Vengeance LPX DDR4 RAM 16-18-18-36@3200MHz, Vdimm = 1.35v
    GPU: MSI GeForce GTX 1080 DirectX 12 with 8GB 256-Bit GDDR5X
    SSD1: Samsung 840 EVO 500GB TLC; SSD2: SAMSUNG 860 EVO 1TB 3-bit MLC
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