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Thread: A walk through the CWT factory

  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by jonnyGURU View Post
    No. A component that's mounted on the underside of the PCB is, and should, stick out a bit further than where you'd want excess component legs.
    How can than the jig run over and only get stuck on the legs, when according to this the underside SMD componens are taller than the legs? That should not work

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    You're right. I did sort of contradict myself there. But I honestly don't remember. I can't recall if the jig had a straight plane or notches for larger SMD components.

    They had this and another piece that looked like a platform that the PCB fit into perfectly and it did have spaces cut out for SMD components and I believe, when the board was pushed down, it would detect anything that was too long. But I can't find a picture of it and can't remember if it was before or after this particular rig. I'll make sure to take another picture next time I'm back there.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jonnyGURU View Post
    Umm... No.

    So the jig finds the obstructions that aren't found by eye. That's a semi-automated process. Then the person trims the leads.

    You've seen the underside of a PSU, right? At least a higher end unit like the RM? There's a lot under there. Not sure how you'd automate that. And no two different models are 100% the same, so it would be very resource consuming to program some sort robot, etc. to clean up that underside.

    What ASUS has done for their GPUs, was my dream that one day will be achieved for the PSUs as well Jonny!
    This kind of production would have instantly eliminated every fear i have about PSU's build quality. :
    Auto-Extreme Technology
    Industry-only 100% Automated Production Process
    All ASUS graphics cards are now produced using Auto-Extreme Technology, an industry-exclusive, 100% automated production process that incorporates premium materials to set a new standard of quality. Auto-Extreme Technology ensures consistent graphics card quality as well as improved performance and longevity. ( http://www.asus.com/Graphics-Cards/R...80-A8G-GAMING/ / https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=67Y1L_kp72Y )
    CPU:Athlon 64 FX60 (2-cores) 2,6GHz
    Mobo:Asrock 939a785g
    cpu cooler:ArcticFreezer13 CO
    RAM:4 GB DDR 400MHz
    GPU:Asus 750 Ti 2GB
    PSU:Seasonic Platinum 660
    Monitor:Asus VE228HR
    Tower:Coolermaster Elite 430

  4. #34
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    Well if they do their best at the PCB so much, why then fuck up the cooler?

    You've seen the Asus Strix cooler? If you're lucky three of the five heat pipes are actually useful. (GTX 1070 Stix and GTX 1080). If you're unlucky even the third heat pipe almost does nothing (RX 480).

    With the Asus RX 480 Strix you pay a lot for the cooler, because it's just expensive. But because only two of the five heat pipes make good contact with the GPU the performance is underwhelming.

    https://www.techpowerup.com/reviews/...TRIX_OC/4.html
    https://www.techpowerup.com/reviews/...0_STRIX/4.html

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    Quote Originally Posted by -The_Mask- View Post
    Well if they do their best at the PCB so much, why then fuck up the cooler? .................
    Never heard anything wrong about Asus's DirectCU II cooling methodology compared to the other industry cooling solutions.
    CPU:Athlon 64 FX60 (2-cores) 2,6GHz
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    cpu cooler:ArcticFreezer13 CO
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    PSU:Seasonic Platinum 660
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    Until every PSU is a wireless design, you're not going to see full automation on a PSU production line.

    Seasonic is about as close as you can get to that, but even they have limitations.

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    Graphics have almost no THT components anymore. In PSUs you won't come to that ever.

    That asus cooler is PoS.

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    Quote Originally Posted by sith'ari View Post
    Never heard anything wrong about Asus's DirectCU II cooling methodology compared to the other industry cooling solutions.
    The problem is this direct thouch heatpipe bullshit.
    On CPUs you can get away with it because they have a copper plate already on it. And on many CPUs the thermal resistance between this copper plate and the bare die is just awful.
    With the Direct CU heatsinks, they put the rough heatsinks on a bare die - and don't care if those have contact with the die or not.

    So a simple, thin(!) copper sheet between heatsink and die can have quite an effect - so around 10K or so was what I've read in the R9-290X thread (they were available for about 250€ for a short time)...

    Quote Originally Posted by jonnyGURU View Post
    Until every PSU is a wireless design, you're not going to see full automation on a PSU production line.

    Seasonic is about as close as you can get to that, but even they have limitations.
    Your RMi/x and HXi/x are already (almost) wireless, are they not?

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    Still, the most wireless (and released) PSU is Andyson's R series:



    The only cables in here come from the transformer. Seasonic's Prime Titanium implementation still uses cables from the AC receptacle to the PCB.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Stefan Payne View Post
    Your RMi/x and HXi/x are already (almost) wireless, are they not?
    Almost isn't enough. You still have wires from the AC input to the main PCB and from the main PCB to the modular interface. And every time a CWT product gets dinged for "quality issues", it's because of the sub-par hand soldering done on these wires.

    Quote Originally Posted by Orion View Post
    Still, the most wireless (and released) PSU is Andyson's R series:



    The only cables in here come from the transformer. Seasonic's Prime Titanium implementation still uses cables from the AC receptacle to the PCB.
    Unfortunately, their factory is the ANTITHESIS of a state of the art factory. I like Andyson's engineers and they did great things for me when I was at BFG, but their factory has a long way to go.

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