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Thread: EVGA Supernova G2/P2 and the lack of OTP

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    Default EVGA Supernova G2/P2 and the lack of OTP

    Hi all,

    I'm in the middle of building a new system and looking at the EVGA G2/P2 series in the 650-750w range based on the strong reviews. Some reviews (tomshardware, techpowerup) knock EVGA/Superflower for not including OTP though, saying it's essentially a crucial safety feature for a high end power supply.

    In this review of the Leadex Platinum, however, it's mentioned that OTP per-se isn't necessarily required:

    While it doesn't feature OTP directly, the proprietary protection chip is set up so that even without OTP, one of the other protections will trip before OTP would stop the power supply. As such, it isn't really even necessary.
    I'm wondering how important this feature really is and if it's true that it's not really required based on the design of the G2/P2/Leadex.

    Thanks!

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    Quote Originally Posted by pjfan1 View Post

    I'm wondering how important this feature really is and if it's true that it's not really required based on the design of the G2/P2/Leadex.
    Thanks!
    -From what i've learned so far, OTP (over temperature protection) is very important since it prevents the components of the PSU from being overheated and thus, being damaged.
    -I don't know if at the EVGA G2/P2 units there is an alternative protection that can make the OTP protection obsolete though
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    Quote Originally Posted by sith'ari View Post
    -From what i've learned so far, OTP (over temperature protection) is very important since it prevents the components of the PSU from being overheated and thus, being damaged.
    It should be in every PSU, only in a passive PSU it's less needed. But even then with a lot of dust or a wrong mounted PSU even a passive PSU can overheat.

    But yeah it's very useful in a PSU with fan, a fan or fan controller can always fail.

    -I don't know if at the EVGA G2/P2 units there is an alternative protection that can make the OTP protection obsolete though
    It can be implemented in different ways, if the protection IC doesn't have OTP it doesn't mean the PSU doesn't offer OTP.

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    Quote Originally Posted by -The_Mask- View Post
    it doesn't mean the PSU doesn't offer OTP.
    ... more properly a "sui generis" OTP (not sure that's exactly what TT wrote: maybe that their ECO fan controller takes care of it?).
    Best, Luca

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    What Tweaktown said doesn't make much sense to me. But if the protection IC doesn't have OTP it still can be implemented. For example the protection IC in the Cooler Master B v2 series doesn't support OTP, but the PSU does have OTP. The thermistor which measures the temperature is connected to a op-amp which is then connected to the 5V UVP. So when the PSU gets to hot according to the OTP thermistor the 5V UVP shuts down the PSU.

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    Quote Originally Posted by -The_Mask- View Post
    The thermistor which measures the temperature is connected to a op-amp which is then connected to the 5V UVP. So when the PSU gets to hot according to the OTP thermistor the 5V UVP shuts down the PSU.
    I guess that smart trick is due to cost reasons, which perhaps should not be the case of SF (and Seasonic too, if I recall correctly behemot's burnt G-series units).
    Best, Luca

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    G-Series has OTP, but having OTP alone doesn't rule out psu dying from heat. The trigger level needs to be configured perfectly.

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    Many of the secondary controller ICs have an auxiliary trigger pin, in addition to the existing OVP/UVP and OCP ones. You can connect pretty much anything and the signal level (voltage) at which it triggers is well-defined. It's just a matter of using a thermistor and a simple amp circuit.

    Potential problems stem from calibration issues - the thermistor and any other components directly influencing the signal level need to have as low a margin of error as possible (strict tolerance). This can make things rather expensive fairly easily.
    Careful what you wish for... You just might get it.

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    I would NEVER say "OTP is not required". That's absolute bullshit. Without OTP, that means your PSU will just EXPLODE if it overheats instead of shutting down. Does THAT sound like a better option to you?

    I agree with what Mask says. What Tweaktown posted doesn't make sense. It either has OTP or it doesn't. I'd bet dollars to donuts that the SuperFlower/EVGA has some sort of OTP. Probably built into the fan controller.

    That said, Aris often looks for the obvious when describing what safety features a PSU has when reviewing for Tom's/TechPowerUp. If the supervisor IC doesn't support OTP, he generally assumes the PSU doesn't have OTP.

    McSteel is correct. Typically, at least in higher end PSUs, the fan controller is used to trigger a pin on the supervisor IC if there's an over temperature situation. No reason to implement multiple thermistors and multiple thermistor safety circuits when you have one that has to monitor temperatures all of the time (the fan controller) and can easily send a shut down signal to the supervisor IC if things get too hot.

    Unfortunately, the problem reviewers have with SuperFlower/EVGA is SuperFlower doesn't have anyone that understands the technology that can explain it effectively/accurately in English to their clients and EVGA doesn't have anyone working there that really knows PSUs. So if a reviewer says "this doesn't seem to have OTP", nobody can get a straight answer because the only guy that truly knows is some Engineer in China that's sleeping in a dorm twenty meters from the factory floor.

    This is why it's important to read multiple reviews by multiple writers and ask questions in the forums.

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    Super Flower Leadex often shut down before "suicide" at over temperature tests, yes. However only the Leadex 1600/2000 have dedicated aditional OTP. I've asked Super Flower about it, they told me that for the smaller models there is no dedicated OTP circuit so they don't advertise it. Also this less obvious implementation has limited use and doesn't help under all circumstances. This design choice itself is quite old. Even the Super Flower made PCP&C and NZXT have a similar feature.

    I'll meet their head of R&D in summer and bring my own translator. We'll know more details soon.

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