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Thread: An error in a PC build

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    Default An error in a PC build

    I had a recent discussion involving a PC power supply accidentally set to 230V in a first time PC build. The system wouldn't power up when plugged into a regular US 110V outlet. Apparently, it did power up after the the power supply switch was set correctly to 110 V. I'm surprised that the power supply wasn't permanently damaged.

    What would the ramifications be to the power supply outputs? I am guessing that since it had a 115V / 230V switch that it wasn't an auto-select PSU. How would the 3.3V, 5V, and 12V outputs be affected? And how would the watts be affected? This is all assuming that the PSU didn't immediately shut down or fry.

    I don't know the specifics on the build in question other than it was a 500 watt power supply and that it had a 115V / 230V selector switch.

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    You're using a PSU that has a 115V/230V switch?

    Take the PSU out. Throw it in the garbage. Buy a new PSU.

    But to answer your question... nothing will happen to the DC side of things because the power never made it past the primary switcher.

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    Quote Originally Posted by terry*2* View Post
    I had a recent discussion involving a PC power supply accidentally set to 230V in a first time PC build. The system wouldn't power up when plugged into a regular US 110V outlet. Apparently, it did power up after the the power supply switch was set correctly to 110 V. I'm surprised that the power supply wasn't permanently damaged.

    What would the ramifications be to the power supply outputs? I am guessing that since it had a 115V / 230V switch that it wasn't an auto-select PSU. How would the 3.3V, 5V, and 12V outputs be affected? And how would the watts be affected? This is all assuming that the PSU didn't immediately shut down or fry.

    I don't know the specifics on the build in question other than it was a 500 watt power supply and that it had a 115V / 230V selector switch.
    Wow still using a PSU without active PFC, its probably passive PFC ... to be clear nothing happens when you switch the power supply to 230v into 110v outlet, it wont power on as there is not enough power going in, however the opposite is the real damage plugging into 230v while using the 110v setting you are doubling the voltage going in ...

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    I suspect that the power supply shut off when the input voltage was out of range. So, the DC voltages would not be affected? As I mentioned, apparently it did power up after changing the switch on the power supply.

    So, the system components wouldn't be affected because it received 110 volts instead of 230V. If the power supply stayed on, would the 12 Volt output be expected to be approximately 12 volts? I would expect it to be much less than 12volts.

    This is just speculation. I wouldn't want to risk a power supply of my own to test it, and besides the PSU would probably just shut off anyway.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jonnyGURU View Post
    You're using a PSU that has a 115V/230V switch?

    Take the PSU out. Throw it in the garbage. Buy a new PSU.

    But to answer your question... nothing will happen to the DC side of things because the power never made it past the primary switcher.

    This isn't my power supply. I've got a nice Seasonic Platinum 860 watt on my main system.

    I was just curious about how a computer would be affected by this error if PSU didn't shut off.

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    If you make the same mistake here, the PSU will go kaboom. I've done it a couple of times before.
    No wonder it doesn't work! You installed the coils backwards

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    Quote Originally Posted by c_hegge View Post
    If you make the same mistake here, the PSU will go kaboom. I've done it a couple of times before.
    It's not quite the "same mistake" if you're flipping it the *other* way. ("120V" on a 240V circuit, vs. "240V" on a 120V circuit like the OP did)

    I have seen a power supply or two, mostly back when voltage selector switches were more common, that would power up and run on 120V with the switch set to "230V". I'd imagine that this is quite hard on the switching transistors.

    As far as the outputs are concerned, they are regulated, and any decent power supply will have undervoltage protection, along with a bunch of other protections. It's not going to put out 6V, 2.5V, 1.7V, etc., and would shut down if something went horribly wrong to make it do so anyway.

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    Quote Originally Posted by cheapie View Post
    It's not quite the "same mistake" if you're flipping it the *other* way. ("120V" on a 240V circuit, vs. "240V" on a 120V circuit like the OP did)

    I have seen a power supply or two, mostly back when voltage selector switches were more common, that would power up and run on 120V with the switch set to "230V". I'd imagine that this is quite hard on the switching transistors.

    As far as the outputs are concerned, they are regulated, and any decent power supply will have undervoltage protection, along with a bunch of other protections. It's not going to put out 6V, 2.5V, 1.7V, etc., and would shut down if something went horribly wrong to make it do so anyway.


    That was my guess that voltages would be approximately reduced by half. But I decided to keep my mouth shut in case I was wrong.

    My other research on Google also suggested that the PSU would (or could) be damaged. I know that 220V to an appliance intended for 110V pretty much destroys it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by c_hegge View Post
    If you make the same mistake here, the PSU will go kaboom. I've done it a couple of times before.
    No, the switch on the power supply was set to 230V and it was plugged into 110V outlet.

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    ^
    Yeah. I know. I was just saying what happens if you do the opposite.
    No wonder it doesn't work! You installed the coils backwards

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