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Thread: Need A Surge Protector Outlet

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    Default Need A Surge Protector Outlet

    Hello everyone,

    I'll buy a surge protector outlet (6 or more ways) to use with my PC, modem and monitor. What should I be looking at? I guess more Joules of protection the better but how many joules is enough? I'm not into some overkill stuff, just need a decent quality unit.

    Looking forward for your advices.

    Best.
    Last edited by supertramp; 01-25-2015 at 07:09 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by supertramp View Post
    I guess more Joules of protection the better but how many joules is enough? I'm not into some overkill stuff, just need a decent quality unit.
    As an end user like you I can't answer precisely, so I hope some good guy will give a look at here.

    A surge protector is basically a MOV, and a MOV wears out according to its joules rating, so the higher the joules ratings, the more it will last.

    So how much is enough? I don't know, as mainly it depends of your grid quality.
    You have to also check the clamping factor, I mean how much the protector will clamp voltage spikes (usually there should be a rating like "it clamps a 500V spike down to 200V" or something similar, at least on decent units).

    Hope these basic hints will help, at least a bit.

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    Thanks for the info.

    Right now looking at Schneider and Philips units, but couldn't see a clamp voltage rating or anything like that. Just joules and they are fairly higher than other brands. Probably both are good units.

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    Quote Originally Posted by supertramp View Post
    but couldn't see a clamp voltage rating or anything like that
    It could be done with an acronym, SVR or VPR, the lower should be the better (but I'm not sure about that info): http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Surge_p...amping_voltage .
    Last edited by quest for silence; 01-26-2015 at 10:52 AM. Reason: corrected info

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    IMO, a surge and spike protector is little more than a fancy and expensive extension cord and therefore, a waste of money and should be avoided. Instead, I recommend a "good" UPS with AVR (uninterruptible power supply with automatic voltage regulation).

    Remember, surge and spike protectors do absolutely nothing for abnormal low voltage events like dips (opposite of spikes) and sags (opposite of surges), or long duration sags (brownouts) - any of which put strain on your device's voltage regulation circuits and can cause your electronics to suddenly stop, resulting in possible data corruption, or worse.

    For abnormal high voltage events, they merely chop off ("clamp") the tops off the sine waves, leaving a not-so pretty voltage for your power supplies to compensate for. And for extreme high-voltage events, they (if working properly) simply and suddenly kill power to your connected devices, again potentially corrupting your hard drives and data - and possibly making your computer unbootable.

    In extreme high or low voltage events, a "good" UPS with AVR will "cut-over" to battery power without allowing any interruption of power to your connected devices. And in the case of a complete power outage, the UPS will provide you plenty of time to finish your paragraph, save your open documents, close your open applications, "gracefully" exit your operating system, and properly shutdown your computer without risk of hardware damage, lost data, corrupt drives, or an unbootable computer.

    And note I say "good" UPS with AVR. Just like computer power supplies, there are cheap, budget supplies that should be avoided, and then there are "good" supplies. A cheap UPS may have poor regulation, but more importantly, may not "cut-over" to battery backup fast enough to avoid disruption of power to your computer. The ATX standard for PSUs requires PSUs "hold" output power for just a mere 16ms in the event of a power loss. That is MUCH FASTER than the human eye can detect and a cheap UPS may not be able to react that fast to keep your computer's PSU humming.

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    Thanks for your advices guys.

    Quote Originally Posted by Digerati View Post
    IMO, a surge and spike protector is little more than a fancy and expensive extension cord and therefore, a waste of money and should be avoided. Instead, I recommend a "good" UPS with AVR (uninterruptible power supply with automatic voltage regulation).
    Yeah, it seems so. I was just in need of an extension cord actually, so after your comments I will just buy a cheap surge protector from a decent brand (probably a philips or schneider) and gonna start saving up for an UPS. We luckily don't have some nasty voltage fluctuations here, and lightning storms are not that often. But power outages became a bit frequent lately. So I really don't need something very serious I guess?

    Would it be feasible to install a regulator or a relay to the power box instead of getting an UPS? These would also offer some protection to other electronics in the house I guess?

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    We luckily don't have some nasty voltage fluctuations here, and lightning storms are not that often.
    Unless you have monitoring equipment in line watching, you won't know that as most fluctuations are faster than you can see. Note that noticeable lights flickering is a very long anomaly! And while maybe not individually destructive, the effect of surges and spike are cumulative - like repetitive loud noises on our ears.

    The problem with full power outages is when the power comes back, it is not always nice and clean but often bang bang bang on our electronics before becoming stable. Not good.

    And note too many destructive anomalies can originate from within your own facility/home - not just off the "grid". Refrigerators, water coolers, microwave ovens, AC units, and your daughter's $15 1500W hair dryer made in some obscure factory in China using parts from a similar factory upriver can send extreme anomalies down the line too. This is why "whole house" suppressors (or regulators) are not as effective as their marketing weenies would like us to believe.

    Finally, you should never plug a UPS with AVR into a surge and spike protector, or connect a surge and spike protector on the output side of a UPS. The UPS may see the source or load as irregular and stay on battery, constantly flip back and forth from line to battery, or simply shutdown power to your connected devices.

    There are very sophisticated regulation devices (that are not UPS) you can get for your system. Audiophiles do this with their expensive audiophile quality stereo and home theater equipment to ensure the purist of audio. But they tend to be more expensive than a good UPS with AVR.

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    These are some great information, thank you.

    So I guess it's better for me to start saving up for a decent UPS. I'm gonna make a market research for available units here in Turkey.

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