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Thread: Why are GTX 670 and 680 cards still so rare/expensive?

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    Default Why are GTX 670 and 680 cards still so rare/expensive?

    When I first got my GTX 670 a couple years back, I had a lot of trouble sourcing one. They were selling for about $100 above retail on eBay, but I just watched until the retailers got them in stock and got mine around $450.

    I was thinking that if I waited a year or two, there would be plenty of them. But it seems like now all I can find are the brand-new GTX 700 series cards. The only 600 series cards I can find are low-end parts. The 670s and 680s are still incredibly rare and around 600 dollars.

    I had planned on getting a second 670 and doing SLI as an upgrade path, but at those prices I could get a new top of the line card.

    So, what exactly happened? Why did the retailers have so much trouble keeping them in stock, and why do I still have to pay $600 for one even though the newer GTX 700 is out?

    The model I got is exceptionally hard to find for some reason, the MSI 670 Power Edition. I've seen that one going for $650-$800 on some sites.

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    So when the GTX880 hits the stores, sell your MSI 670 PE for the stupidly high price that it carries and get yourself the newest flagship card.
    Careful what you wish for... You just might get it.

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    Well, those are the prices of new ones. They're treating it like some kind of collector's item. A lot of times used video cards are on their last legs or something because they were heavily overclocked or used for mining Bitcoins, so I try to buy new if I can. That Bitcoin thing really has helped in killing the used video card market.

    I did find out what happened, though. Apparently all the chips being used for the 670 and 680 were put into new cards called the 770 and 760 Ti. Conveniently, however, these cards won't work in SLI with the old ones because they changed the model number. Even though it's basically the same card.

    So essentially, it's a rare part because most of the unsold ones were rebadged as new models, and most people would rather overpay to add a second card for SLI than buy two new cards and try to sell off the old one.

    Oh, well, I probably didn't NEED the extra card anyway, since I only have a 1080p monitor. It just would have been nice to have the performance available. Especially since I built my computer around getting an SLI setup eventually, in case I ever wanted it.

    I'll stick with just this one until 2016, when I'm planning to build my next computer and put the latest graphics card into it. It seems like SLI rarely benefits anyone who doesn't buy two of the same card to start with. I should probably just go ahead and put other stuff into the expansion slots and just not worry about saving room for that second card.
    Last edited by athenian200; 07-26-2014 at 10:54 PM.

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    Damn, these cards went UP in price? I got a new GPU about 6 months ago, and at the time, the 670 and 760 were the same price. I got a 670 because it had more grunt for similar overall performance.
    From what I read, the 760Ti is just a 670 with the firmware tweaked to include GPU Boost V2, but it's only available as an OEM part.

    If you got hold of a 760Ti, you could possibly flash it with the 670 firmware to SLI them (or vice-versa). Do so at your own risk however, and keep backups of the original firmware from each card.
    Intel i7-2600k with an XSPC Raystorm water block, 4x4GB Corsair Dominator, SLi Evga-GTX560Ti-448 FTWs, Asrock Extreme4 Gen3, Crucial M4 256GB SSD, Samsung Spinpoint F3 1TB HDD, powered by a Silverstone Strider+ 850 PSU in a Silverstone TJ-07BW case.
    I'm not buying EK GPU blocks ever again. (One GPU killed)

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    athenian200 (07-27-2014)

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    Quote Originally Posted by allikat View Post
    Damn, these cards went UP in price? I got a new GPU about 6 months ago, and at the time, the 670 and 760 were the same price. I got a 670 because it had more grunt for similar overall performance.
    From what I read, the 760Ti is just a 670 with the firmware tweaked to include GPU Boost V2, but it's only available as an OEM part.

    If you got hold of a 760Ti, you could possibly flash it with the 670 firmware to SLI them (or vice-versa). Do so at your own risk however, and keep backups of the original firmware from each card.
    Yeah, I was surprised too. I purchased a reference 680 around launch time, and realized before I even took the shrink wrap off that I could make another $200 reselling it on eBay due the supply problems. So I did. Then I found out that MSI's 670 could actually beat a 680 in many games for $100 less, and got that card instead. I effectively got this card for only $300 because I was patient and took the right opportunities. If I had known these cards would keep going up like this, I wouldn't have unwrapped this one either.

    I did consider doing that, but I've heard that flashing it only changes the BIOS, and that for SLI it looks at some kind of hardwired device ID that can't be modified even with a flash.

    If I really wanted SLI badly enough, I could buy two 770s and sell my current card, while not paying any more than I would for a new 670 PE. That would improve performance considerably, given that 770s are essentially overclocked 680s with faster RAM.

    It was one thing when I thought I might be able to just put a marked-down card into my system and set up some drivers, but when it comes down to investing serious money into it, taking risks, and trying to resell a card... it's just not worth it. Especially since I only have 1080p and may not even notice much of a performance increase in practical terms. I've heard people say you don't get much benefit unless you use the higher resolutions, and I only just got my first 1080p monitor with this build. Before that, I was still on 1280x1024.
    Last edited by athenian200; 07-27-2014 at 05:11 AM.

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