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Thread: Exclusive: Platinum Huntkey FX500SE power supply in Europe (review)

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    Quote Originally Posted by Behemot View Post
    What do you mean? It was supposed to be passive only or?
    No, the complaint is that a Moderately high end unit has a very low end fan in it.

    Generally in the high end market you either see high end Double Ball Bearing fans or Fluid Dynamic Bearing fans as they generally have longer life spans and lower noise levels.

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    Fluid bearing fans are just overhyped self-lubricating sleeve bearings. Usually there are very small spirals on the rotor which constantly push the lubricant in position from where it escapes between rotor and stator (thus the oil acts as the bearing) where are catched by the spirals again.

    Ball bearings are usually noisier, especially when they wear out.

    But I don't really see a problem in the fan used. Here it will either sit still or spin on very low speed so I think even the cheapest crap from cheapest craps will survive decade at least…

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    Those who see the problem are usually those who want minimal noise output.

    Most ball bearing and sleeve bearing fans even at low rpms (~400-500-ish) emit sound that is usually audible from a meter away, given rest of the setup is sufficiently quiet.

    The fans that are pretty much silent are either FDB, Twister Bearing or some cherry picked sleeve bearing ones (like SilentWings in L8 series).

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    The L8 series is silent mainly thanks to insufficient cooling in the first place. That thing (L8 CM 530 W) turned off probably one second before it died for me - output rectifiers for +12 V were so hot it initially tested as short. Than it cooled down and worked again…

    But really, can you hear any sleeve bearing fan when it's turned off (up to 250-300 watts in case of FX500SE) or spinnig at minimum (don't know how much it was but likely somewhere between 500 and 800 RPM)?

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    The L8 series is silent mainly thanks to insufficient cooling in the first place. That thing (L8 CM 530 W) turned off probably one second before it died for me - output rectifiers for +12 V were so hot it initially tested as short. Than it cooled down and worked again…
    I'm talking exclusively about idle cooling. Under heavy load it's obvious you need more, especially if efficiency isn't too high.

    spinnig at minimum (don't know how much it was but likely somewhere between 500 and 800 RPM)?
    No problem, again, assuming rest is sufficiently quiet.

    And this is pretty broad range, at 500-600 rpm they would be almost silent, if not for the bearing noise, at 700-800 rpm you would start to hear some airflow noise, assuming we're talking about standard 120 mm 7-blade fan. For bigger fans same would happen a bit earlier.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Behemot View Post
    Fluid bearing fans are just overhyped self-lubricating sleeve bearings. Usually there are very small spirals on the rotor which constantly push the lubricant in position from where it escapes between rotor and stator (thus the oil acts as the bearing) where are catched by the spirals again.

    Ball bearings are usually noisier, especially when they wear out.

    But I don't really see a problem in the fan used. Here it will either sit still or spin on very low speed so I think even the cheapest crap from cheapest craps will survive decade at least…
    High End 2BB fans the likes that come from Sanyo Denki & Nidec Servo are quieter than most basic sleeve bearing fans.

    Also, an FDB is an oil based bearing, but it in no means is an overhyped sleeve bearing.
    What you're describing is a rifle bearing, which has probably been sold to you as an FDB as that happens often on the consumer market.

    A big distinction between FDB (or their counterparts not called FDB's) in that the entire chamber is sealed so air won't even get in which prevents a big issue with most other oil based bearings, leakage.

    The rare occasion when we get them, Mag-Lev bearings are also nice to see in any instance where you want low noise output.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tator Tot View Post
    High End 2BB fans the likes that come from Sanyo Denki & Nidec Servo are quieter than most basic sleeve bearing fans.
    I don't necessarily agree. The Sanyo Denki's in the Seasonic X-Series & Corsair AX Series have a definite "click click click" noise at low RPMs.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tator Tot View Post
    High End 2BB fans the likes that come from Sanyo Denki & Nidec Servo are quieter than most basic sleeve bearing fans.

    Also, an FDB is an oil based bearing, but it in no means is an overhyped sleeve bearing.
    What you're describing is a rifle bearing, which has probably been sold to you as an FDB as that happens often on the consumer market.

    A big distinction between FDB (or their counterparts not called FDB's) in that the entire chamber is sealed so air won't even get in which prevents a big issue with most other oil based bearings, leakage.

    The rare occasion when we get them, Mag-Lev bearings are also nice to see in any instance where you want low noise output.
    I've read some materials from Delta some time ago about their fluid bearing fans and it was exactly what I've described.

    Having the bearing sealed is the worst thing possible. For example the small maglev fans die quite a bit too much for my taste (and their price) in Cisco Catalyst switches. And when that happens, you can throw it away. With non-sealed bearing, you just add lubricant and it works happily again.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jonnyGURU View Post
    I don't necessarily agree. The Sanyo Denki's in the Seasonic X-Series & Corsair AX Series have a definite "click click click" noise at low RPMs.
    That's just a problem with 2BB fans. It's also why you design your fan profile around it.

    It's entirely based on who makes the fan & at what speeds it's rated to run as to what RPM range will produce that noise but it is fairly consistent with 2BB's.

    On the other hand, fans like the Nidec Servo Gentle Typhoons mitigate the amount of noise being made with some clever tricks so the tone & pitch is something that most folks don't find annoying.

    It's present on the Antec Signature units, as they use Nidec 2BB's but the design helps them stay pretty quiet (especially for the time they were made) even though the design is a server one and the fan can ramp up to some pretty high speeds (being a 80mm after all.)

    Nidec's Beta series of fans are used in a lot of Dell towers as well, for that very reason.

    Quote Originally Posted by Behemot View Post
    I've read some materials from Delta some time ago about their fluid bearing fans and it was exactly what I've described.

    Having the bearing sealed is the worst thing possible. For example the small maglev fans die quite a bit too much for my taste (and their price) in Cisco Catalyst switches. And when that happens, you can throw it away. With non-sealed bearing, you just add lubricant and it works happily again.
    Except that any true FDB you buy on the market (Scythe S-Flex, Noctua's SS02 Bearing Fans, Thermalright's TY fans with the FDB, Be Quiet!'s Silent Wings with FDBs) has a sealed bearing.

    Part of the reason they seal the bearing is that an FDB's fluid is generally designed to last longer at higher temperatures than what you find in a typical sleeve bearing fan.

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