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CAD4466HK
03-25-2007, 07:51 PM
I'm not to sure of this review :(
But that's my opinion :p

http://www.bit-tech.net/hardware/2007/03/21/lga775_heatsink_group_test_mar07/1.html

TheCynical1
03-25-2007, 11:12 PM
I noticed that some of the more popular coolers were missing...Tunic Tower, various Thermalright models, Arctic Cooling Freezer series, and various Scythe models (the Infinity and Ninja spring to mind).

Overall, I though it was a fairly decent read. Since I already have my HSF unit for my next build picked out (it's actually sitting on the shelf waiting for the rest of the parts to show up): a Thermalright SI-128 with a Silverstone FM-121B fan on top, the article didn't tell me anything I didn't know already, but for someone looking for their next HSF unit, its not a real bad starting spot for research.

TheCynical1

SuperSix
03-26-2007, 12:03 AM
How many reviews does one have to read before they realize that Zalman OWNS this market?

Jon Gerow
03-26-2007, 07:29 AM
How many reviews does one have to read before they realize that Zalman OWNS this market?

If you have the flow... the ChillTEC owns! :D

http://virtual-hideout.net/reviews/Ultra_Chill_Tec/index.shtml and

http://modders-inc.com/reviews-story--99.html

Damn... I hijacked a thread. :(

Kab
03-26-2007, 08:03 AM
Impressed with the Zalman 9700.. I didn't think it was all that comparable to the Noctua. In other reviews the Noctua is shown to be much better! :eek:

Tazz
03-26-2007, 08:14 AM
They stated they had it running vertical due to NB heatsink, which made it fight for air.

Grov
05-04-2007, 07:28 AM
Hah.

No Thermalright 120 Ultra/Extreme, no Tuniq Tower, seeing as those are the best 3 coolers on the market, bit of a crap review.

Who said Zalman owns the market? *Slap*

Evilsizer
05-04-2007, 09:00 AM
where is the U-120E and U-90E?!?!?

Telstar
05-04-2007, 09:59 AM
I'd rather say that Thermalright own the performance crowns.

whitebrow
05-04-2007, 02:34 PM
This was posted 03-25-2007, 06:51 PM.

Probably why the newest Thermalright offerings weren't included :D.

I think it's pretty safe to say IFX14 > U-120 Extreme > rest

Terru
05-07-2007, 06:58 PM
Another vote for Thermalright, they really do make some of the best, if not the best all round heatsinks. From quality of consturction to ease of install and of course performance, you cannot beat them. The only other heatsinks that are in the same field are the enzotech, tuniq and scythe series.

Zalman does make good stuff, but its CPU coolers are over-priced and under-performing.

I think the best bet for a reasonable air cooler would be a Thermalright Ultra-120 eXtreme with a scythe s-flex fan. Any other thoughts?

Grov
05-08-2007, 08:45 AM
I think the best bet for a reasonable air cooler would be a Thermalright Ultra-120 eXtreme with a scythe s-flex fan. Any other thoughts?

Thats probably the best money can buy for air cooling at the mo. Id like to see a few reviews, of both TR Ultra-120's, the Tuniq Tower, and the Noctua.

Jon Gerow
05-08-2007, 12:14 PM
Is it me or does the Thermalright Ultra-120 look just like the 3R Systems Ice Age?

I wonder if the same review site has reviewed both the Ultra-120 and the Ice Age and how they stack up against each other.

alexk
05-08-2007, 01:38 PM
Is it me or does the Thermalright Ultra-120 look just like the 3R Systems Ice Age?


Yea, it does, but you know how it often goes in heatsink world - "if you can't come up with your own design, just copy it from someone else"... Of course, I am not talking about Thermalright :p

Jon Gerow
05-08-2007, 03:26 PM
You're not?

The 3R Systems Ice Age has been around for a long time. How long has the Thermalright been around?

alexk
05-08-2007, 04:14 PM
I don't really know much about 3RSystems - first time I've heard about them and their product was by reading here:
http://www.techpowerup.com/reviews/CeBIT_2007/3RSystem

The Thermalright Ultra-120 was available for purchase since last summer or so (I believe it was July when I started to see the reviews for it and it being available at major online stores)... And besides that, to me the Ultra-120 looks simply like a slightly improved version of XP-120 (which is a very old cooler) - Thermalright just added 3 extra heatpipes and bent the main surface upwards (to make it stand "vertical") :-P

Jon Gerow
05-09-2007, 09:36 AM
Hmm... the 3R has the heatpipes in contact with the CPU while the Thermalright has the heatpipes in between two plates. I'm willing to bet the 3R cools better.

I think I need to buy me some heatsinks!

Hey OKW! Up for another CPU cooler review? ;)

Terru
05-09-2007, 01:57 PM
I would love to see an honest CPU cooler review with these products, and if the 3R-systems product is better, we have everything to gain.

However, in my humble and ignorant opinion, I think that the Ultra-120 eXtreme is on the top right now. I don't think that Thermalight would blatantly copy another design; it is just that most tower-style coolers look very similar due to their nature. I mean, heat pipes attached to a metal base and thin metal plates can only be so different, right?

alexk
05-10-2007, 05:21 PM
Hmm... the 3R has the heatpipes in contact with the CPU while the Thermalright has the heatpipes in between two plates. I'm willing to bet the 3R cools better.


Thermalright (as well as any other good heatsink designer/manufacturer, like Arctic Cooling or Scythe) uses a flat plate between CPU's heatspreader and heatpipes to provide maximum surface area contact. When you get such "innovative" :rolleyes: design as letting "naked" heatpipes directly contact the CPU's heatspreader, you get results like this:
http://www.techpowerup.com/reviews/3RSystem/ICEAGE/images/paste2.jpg
http://www.techpowerup.com/reviews/3RSystem/ICEAGE/images/paste1.jpg
Ignoring the overall excessive use of thermal paste (which is actually good since it shows the results more clearly), you can clearly see the "gaps" where the paste accumulated (such as area between the heatpipes), these "gaps" show the total lack of contact between the heatsink and CPU's heatspreader. Sure, the thermal paste still conducts heat, but it's not as efficient as the direct metal contact :p Not to mention that you have to be extra careful if you'll decide to further polish the base of this "innovative" heatsink (to increase direct metal contact area) since you'll be actually polishing the heatpipes themselves and you don't really know how thick the walls are on these heatpipes.

Jon Gerow
05-10-2007, 05:54 PM
Right... but you have to realize that even these "naked" heatpipes still are not in direct contact with the core. The CPU has a heatspreader on it. So why bother with a cooler heatspreader on a CPU heatspreader when you can have heatpipes in direct contact with the CPU's heatspreader?

The argumnent that the heatpipes don't make direct contact with 100% of the CPU's heatspreader lacks logic. Do you think that the contact between the Thermaltake's "heatspeader" and it's heatpips are "perfect?" ;)

Evilsizer
05-10-2007, 06:27 PM
the only perfect contact is to directly solder the hs to the DIE of the cpu.

alexk
05-10-2007, 07:23 PM
why bother with a cooler heatspreader on a CPU heatspreader when you can have heatpipes in direct contact with the CPU's heatspreader
Oh gee, I dunno... could it be because heatpipes don't produce a good contact with the CPU's heatspreader (leaving obvious gaps, as seen on the photos) and because the "naked" heatpipes have other drawbacks (such as the one that I mentioned in my previous post, about polishing/sanding)? Have you even read what I posted in my previous post?



The argumnent that the heatpipes don't make direct contact with 100% of the CPU's heatspreader lacks logic.
How does it "lacks logic" if ANYONE can see it with their own eyes from the photos (or do their own tests, if they have this heatsink) :confused:



Do you think that the contact between the Thermaltake's "heatspeader" and it's heatpips are "perfect?" ;)

Maybe, or maybe not, but I might as well assume they are "perfect" since I haven't seen any photos (or other media) which would suggest otherwise (that there are small "gaps" not filled properly with solder between the heatpipes and the heatspreaders on the Thermalright's or Arctic Cooling's or other similar types of heatsinks) :p

Jon Gerow
05-10-2007, 07:38 PM
Whoa whoa whoa... Don't start sounding like a Thermalright fan boy now. ;)

I say it lacks logic because common sense would dictate that the less material between creating the heat and what's dissipating the most heat is going to be the best thermal option.

The little aluminum plate on the Thermalright is not going to dissipate much heat by itself. Obviously it's there to give a smooth surface between the CPU's heat spreader and the heatpipes. But you can't tell me that the heatpipe's aren't the whole point of the Thermalright, right? The heat still has to make it to the copper heatpipes and wick their way up to the radiator. Same is true with the Ice Age, but with the Ice Age they don't have to go through an aluminum plate first.

As for the "gaps" in the Ice Age, I don't see where that poses a problem. I mean, it's not like heat is going to "blockade" in the gaps. Heat needs to be thought of as fluid almost. The heat will make it's way to the heatpipes and thus wick their way up the heatpipes. So gaps or not, it just seems to me that having the same heatpipes you would have one any other heatsink having direct contact with the CPU heatspreader would provide better heat dissipation than heat having to go through an aluminum block that doesn't have as good of thermal conductivity before getting to the heatpipes.

That's all. Seemed obvious to me. Didn't mean to sound insulting if it didn't seem obvious to you. I've got an Ice Age and Ultra-120 on order and Wolf has volunteered to do the shoot out so we'll see.... without any Thermalright fan boyism. ;)

It's too bad techPowerUp! didn't have a Thermalright to compare to the Ice Age, but you have to admit that it's impressive that it beat out every other heatsink they used by a pretty decent margin.

And for the record: My machines have a Corsair Nautilus, an Asus Silent Square and a couple Ultra X-Winds. Just so you know I'm not picking favorites here. I'm not saying the Thermalright DOESN'T cool any better than the 3R. All I'm saying is "it would seem like the 3R would cool better." You don't see my logic behind that and that's cool. But we also haven't seen enough 3R Ice Age reviews to say that it doesn't cool better either.

alexk
05-10-2007, 09:50 PM
Whoa whoa whoa... Don't start sounding like a Thermalright fan boy now

Fanboy? Hardly - all my current heatsinks that are currently in use are made by Arctic Cooling, and it's not quite the same company as Thermalright, wouldn't you agree? :D I am not even a "fanboy" of the heatsinks with heatpipes in general - I have a regular aluminium (or aluminum, however the hell it's spelled in whatever country) $16 AC heatsink+fan happily cooling my overclocked (by 400 MHz) AMD X2 CPU :p Not to mention the Zalman's video cooler that is happily cooling one of my video cards (which is powered by ATI GPU) in my other PC, as well as the excellent Antec case (filled with Antec's fans) that is being used for my primary PC (which, surprisingly, has a video card with Nvidia's GPU). I suppose I can also mention that I have different brands of power supplies powering each of my PC's (from FSP to Enermax). So I am far from being a "fanboy" of something, I just choose whatever product that has best "features : perfomance : price" ratio at whatever moment I decide to shop around, regardless of the silly brand names which might be stamped on these products :p



I say it lacks logic because common sense would dictate that the less material between creating the heat and what's dissipating the most heat is going to be the best thermal option.

Yes, it would dictate that (I never said that thickness has no role on thermal conductance, I did went to college after all :p ), but common sense would also dictate that the more direct contact area between 2 conducting materials (such as between 2 copper plates) = the faster the heat will flow between them, no? And that any sort of gaps will decrease that direct contact area, thus causing the slower heat transfer (why else would some people get decreased temperature of their CPU's when they polish the surface area of their heatsinks to a mirror-like state?). So how does this lacks logic, since this is what I exactly meant when I first mentioned the gaps on that "ice age" heatsink? :p




As for the "gaps" in the Ice Age, I don't see where that poses a problem
O RLY (now where is that "owl" smilie when you need it most?...)? :D No problem at all? Not even the fact that the air or thermal paste that will fill these gaps will conduct the heat much slower (and letting CPU heat up higher) compared to the situation where there wouldn't be any gaps (or at least not as huge and visible gaps as on this heatsink)?



Didn't mean to sound insulting Oh, it's not insulting in any way, especially since there was nothing logically wrong with what I actually said :p On the other hand, speaking about gaps having no impact on heat transfer is... well... how should I put this... Well, I'll also try to not be insulting towards anyone :D



I've got an Ice Age and Ultra-120 on order and Wolf has volunteered to do the shoot out so we'll see....

That's good, but whether one of the heatsinks will beat the other will not really show the effectiveness of one method of heat transfer ("naked heatpipes" directly touching the CPU's heatspreader) versus the other (more traditional approach) since there are many variables involved (the total surface area of all the fins, the quality of soldering points between the fins and the heatpipes, the exact material that the fins and the heatspreaders are made from, etc.) :p Of course, you might try to modify the Thermalright's heatsink in the same way the "ice age" is modified - by removing the lower heatspreader plate (exposing the heatpipes), then somehow "flattening" the exposed heatpipes and then comparing the results with the stock version of Thermalright's heatsink... Now THAT would be really interesting.

P.S: I should really, REALLY stop writing such long-winded posts :o

madmat
05-10-2007, 11:41 PM
Actually alexk, you're splitting hairs here. The current crop of CPU's all have heatspreaders on them so the heatspreader in question is acting as the bottom plate for the IceAge. If you look at many of the heatpipe coolers on the market they have the heatpipes going into the CPU interface plate and it's just gooped up with a shitload of thermal grease. The IceAge simply takes that out of the equation. The heatspreader is going to give the cooler more contact area than the CPU die has and it will stop hot spots on the die by doing what it's name implies... spreading the heat.

UncleJT
05-13-2007, 09:25 AM
Ok, I'm going to ask for a recommendation from the other side for a change.

Can someone recommend an LGA775 cooler purely from a bling-bling view before performance? I'm building my first windowed system and looking for bling.

I am currently running a Cedar Mill core and it idles around typically around 20C with the retail HSF. So anything that performs the same or better than this will be fine.

However, I don't have a lot of height, the largest cooler that I measured for is 78mm.

Thanks

- JT

madmat
05-13-2007, 09:28 AM
For bling the Zalman CNPS9500 LED is awesome.

UncleJT
05-13-2007, 09:38 AM
The 9500 is sweet but too tall for my application. I'm also considering a Swiftech MCX775-V (http://www.frozencpu.com/images/products/large/cpu-swi-16.jpg) with a cold cathode fan on top.

Too many choices. Heh.

- JT

The Thermaltake Blue Orb II (http://www.frozencpu.com/images/products/large/cpu-tta-29.jpg) looks cool as well but always seems to be out of stock everywhere. I just worry about the fans on coolers like this burning out.. have to replace the whole thing.

- JT

madmat
05-13-2007, 10:11 AM
Or breaking a fan blade.

UncleJT
05-13-2007, 01:09 PM
Hmm, ya know. The inside of my case is painted black, my motherboard is red and black, when I build my new PSU cables I am going to be using red connectors, black heatshrink, and red sleeving.

Maybe I should go with a Red Orb (http://www.performance-pcs.com/catalog/images/products/CL-P0391_01.jpg) then. :cool:

- JT

Jon Gerow
05-13-2007, 04:33 PM
Don't get the Blue Orb. Unlike the Zalman and the Ultra X-Wind, it has thick fins and thick fins don't dissipate heat as quickly as the thin ones on the Zalman and Ultra. You get what you pay for. ;)

If Swiftech is on your "short list" I'm going to tell you to get the Swiftech.

UncleJT
05-13-2007, 04:35 PM
If Swiftech is on your "short list" I'm going to tell you to get the Swiftech.
Yeah, my list keeps getting shorter and shorter but the Swiftech continues to remain in the top spot.

- JT

UncleJT
05-14-2007, 11:15 PM
Hey, what do you guys think of the offerings from ZeroTherm? I know Tazz wrote pretty highly about the BTF90. I kind of find the Butterfly styling to be a unique, welcoming, addition to the fold. Think they'll be able to stick around for awhile?

The BTF90 has been added to my list for my new build. I think a Butterfly could look pretty fly in a modified MicroFly. :)

- JT

Evilsizer
05-14-2007, 11:17 PM
if you dont oc it should be ok, imo for the price you prolly can do better.

UncleJT
05-14-2007, 11:20 PM
Yeah, I don't OC very much. Hell, my 65nm core stays cold with the OEM HSF no matter what I do... I'm just looking for bling and something different. The MicroFly will be all my left, so I want something cool to look at whenever I glance over. Heh.

- JT

UncleJT
05-14-2007, 11:26 PM
Oh hell, the BTF90 is cheaper than I thought. $36.99 after $10 rebate. I was expecting a $60 HSF. So long as their rebate program WORKS, I don't think it's that bad of a deal at all.

- JT

Tazz
05-15-2007, 01:22 AM
You will want to check the available space in the MicroFly before buying a huge cooler for it. There are support brackets in the case that can cause issues with installing larger coolers.

UncleJT
05-15-2007, 07:10 AM
You will want to check the available space in the MicroFly before buying a huge cooler for it. There are support brackets in the case that can cause issues with installing larger coolers.
Yup, that's why I said "modified MicroFly". I'm planning on doing a bit of aluminum work to it. :) I've seen pics (http://i34.photobucket.com/albums/d140/jedihobbit/DreamCatcher/9500FromSideSM.jpg) of a Zalman 9500 in it, if that fits one of these Butterflies should. I'm thinking a BTF90 and a GX810 would be a pretty nice combo. :cool:

- JT

Tazz
05-15-2007, 12:49 PM
You will also want to keep in mind that with the GX810 and the GX815 VGA coolers, the video card will have to be installed after the motherboard tray is slid in the chassis. You will also want to verify clearance between the cooler and the PSU after both are installed.

An XFX card with the side bracket installed barely scrapes by and these coolers will stick out another 1/4" past that.

UncleJT
05-15-2007, 01:09 PM
Yeah, thanks for the tip Tazz. I figured there'd be some clearance issues. Here's a pic (http://i34.photobucket.com/albums/d140/jedihobbit/DreamCatcher/1stAssyLftSideSM.jpg) of a Zalman on an X1950Pro in a McFly. I think the GX810 is a little bit smaller than that so I should be ok. Hey, if it doesn't work, that is all part of modding! :cool:

Edit: Ahh, my bad. The Zalman is a little bit smaller. Hmm!

- JT

UncleJT
05-20-2007, 05:19 PM
Well, I finally made a decision and just pulled the trigger @ NewEgg. Decided to go with a ZeroTherm BTF90 for my MicroFly build. $29.99 after MIR is a pretty sweet deal. All the modifications to my case have been made, I'm now just waiting for decent weather so I can paint.

This is gonna be cool. :cool:

- JT