EVGA 450BT 450W Power Supply

REVIEW INFORMATION
SUPPLIED BY: JonnyGURU.com
MANUFACTURER: EVGA
PRODUCT: 450BT 450W
PROD LINK: 450BT Product Page
PRICE: $44.99 @ NewEgg
Price is at the time of testing!

450BT 450W

Well, that would be a sleeve bearing fan, and with a three-year warranty I’ll be taking away the fan point. NewEgg claims the warranty has been increased to five years, but that’s not what EVGA’s own product page says so I’ll go by that.

450BT 450W

The unit itself appears to be built by RSY using an old Super Flower design. I guess that explains why it’s half decent for old computers. I see no evidence of heat damage indicating hot spots, but clearly, something was going on the way the 3.3V rail kept creeping up on us. Certainly, I wouldn’t let this unit go above thirty degrees at full power. It won’t shut down… it’ll just run until it blows.

I think I have to score on that, though traditionally overtemp protection was never found on units like this until Corsair started doing it.

450BT 450W

Line filtering starts here with a coil and an X cap. The fuse is also found here.

450BT 450W

Soldering on this unit initially looked Ok, but there was a foam pad on the left side of the board. A lot of OEMs do this for markets where insects are expected to invade the insides. We saw that with the Sama Forza Titanium way back when.

In this case, the foam pad was hiding a nasty solder booger. You can see it where the yellow arrow is pointing. That’s going to remove the whole solder point later.

450BT 450W

Moving on, we find more line filter here. This includes four Y caps, three X caps, another coil, and a MOV. Said MOV is overrated to the point it offers no protection, so I’ll be scoring against it like it’s not there. Because electrically, it isn’t there.

450BT 450W

All capacitors in this unit are second tier Teapo 105 degree units. I have no major quarrel with those. A GR8323N handles protection for the unit. This IC does have over and under volt protection, but it’s set too loose at 3.7V to catch the 3.3V tomfoolery we saw in the hot tests.

450BT 450W

A FAN4800C along with a CM03AX handle PWM and PFC control, respectively.

450BT 450W

The 12V output is done using two S30M60C parts.

450BT 450W

Meanwhile, the 5V and 3.3V outputs each get one S30M45C. That S10C60C on the end is for standby.

450BT 450W

Finally, here’s the primary heatsink. One GBU806 bridge, one PFC diode, and four 5R280CE parts… two for PFC, two for switching. These are higher quality than I expected to find, which could explain why I didn’t get the power meter creep I usually see with units getting ready to pop. This unit appears to be better able to handle high temperatures on the primary than the secondary.

Let’s go score us a power supply.