Corsair SF600 Platinum Power Supply

REVIEW INFORMATION
SUPPLIED BY: Corsair
PRODUCT: Corsair SF600 Platinum
PROD LINK: SF600 Platinum Product Page
PRICE: $139.99
Price is at time of testing!

Corsair SF600 Platinum

First, here’s the fan. Corsair’s power supply fans usually hold up pretty well, unlike some of their case fans, and with a seven year warranty I’m not worried about this one.

Corsair SF600 Platinum

Looking at the guts, it appears that this unit comes from Greatwall’s factory. They built the last SF600, so it makes sense they’d be up for evolving it to this generation.

Corsair SF600 Platinum

Most of the control circuitry is under the mainboard, including a CM6901 PWM controller, CM6502 PFC controller, 5QR1680AG standby controller, IN1S429 protection IC, and an Si8230BD ISOdriver. Four AON6590s handle 12V output, with room for two more. Hmm… maybe Corsair has a more powerful model coming up?

Soldering is all top notch in here.

Corsair SF600 Platinum

Line filtering starts with one X cap, a coil, and two Y caps.

Corsair SF600 Platinum

And continues with two coils, one more X cap, two more Y caps, and a surge suppression device.

I’m loving the layout of this unit so far, especially all the wide open space for ventilation on the left. The 12V parts get indirectly cooled through the transformer and PCB, so it’s nice to see that area uncluttered.

Corsair SF600 Platinum

Here, you can see the PFC diode along with one of the two 60F2094s that handle switching duty. That’s a Rubycon capacitor on the far right.

Corsair SF600 Platinum

There’s the PFC MOSFET, a 60C7099 part.

Corsair SF600 Platinum

Most capacitors are Nippon Chemi-Con, but the odd few are Rubycon, as mentioned.

Corsair SF600 Platinum

The minor rail VRM also handles fan control. On this side, we see a PIC16F1824 microcontroller.

Corsair SF600 Platinum

And on the other side, we find the working parts of the 3.3V and 5V outputs, including an APW7159C controller and four 2R030 parts.

Corsair SF600 Platinum

Last, here’s the modular board. Let’s go get some scoring done, and then I can get back to what I was doing before… trying to fix the ghost haunting my Hitachi LCD TV in the other room that turns itself on at random and plays dead at other times.

Seriously, that TV is 6′ away from my grandpa’s Hitachi tube set from 1975 that still works and has a phenomenally bright CRT after all this time. I’d say they’re not building them like they used to, but Hitachi didn’t even build this LCD themselves. Orion of Japan did. Come on, Hitachi, your name on a TV set used to mean something!

But enough about that. We’re going to do some scoring.