FSP Twins 500W Redundant Power Supply

REVIEW INFORMATION
SUPPLIED BY: FSP
MANUFACTURER: FSP
PRODUCT: Twins 500W Redundant
PROD LINK: Twins 500W Product Page
PRICE: $399.00 @ NewEgg
Price is at time of testing!

FSP Twins 500W

Now, we move on to the modules themselves. Small as they are, there are no power switches… just a buzzer reset button that doubles as a status indicator. They flash in standby, solid in operation. Red means there’s no AC power coming in, green means everything works. These modules are cleared for full 115V operation, so we should be Ok for all testing procedures, though again I won’t be able to fully test their 230V efficiency claims.

FSP Twins 500W

Side view. That’s one serious looking fan hanging off the back.

FSP Twins 500W

In fact, these fans are 40x40x28mm speed demons. They have to be, so they can push air through such a small housing. Expect these little guys to be loud. Again, this solution isn’t for silent computing builds, this is for industrial grade redundancy. Silence is never a priority in that market.

FSP Twins 500W

Bottom view, giving you a hint as to why I cannot test these modules by themselves… I’ve got no way to plug them into the load testers without using the frame, which would immediately skew the results.

FSP Twins 500W

I’ve made the full size version of this shot 1440P, so you can easily see the labels. Each module is rated for 520W at full power, fifty degrees. Each module can handle 43.3A at 12V, 3A 5VSB. Any time both are inserted in the frame and powered, they both work together.

This means because we have two modules cooperating together, low load efficiency and standby efficiency are going to suck, unless FSP took steps to offload one module. I hope they did, actually. Industrial grade gear is all well and good, but we don’t need full redundancy all the way to zero load.

FSP Twins 500W

Now we’re adding the modules to the frame. Snug as a bug in a rug with a jug of glug acting smug. They clip right into place… to release, push down the catch above the receptacle, grab the handle, and pull the module out.

FSP Twins 500W

Now you can see where those little 40mm screamers end up. I’m thankful to have them as far away from the exhaust grilles as possible – that may help with the noise.

FSP Twins 500W

Now, I get to complain. Ribbon cabling is nice, and certainly looks nice, but that ATX cable is a disaster. Too many ribbons going to one connector. Again, I prefer traditional sleeving there.

FSP Twins 500W

The ATX connector is a straight 24 pin job. No extra capacitors, no 20+4 pin nonsense.

FSP Twins 500W

There are two ATX/EPS12V connectors for CPUs on this unit… while not necessary for most of our motherboards, multiple connectors are often found on the server grade components even at this power level, so the extra one is appreciated.

FSP Twins 500W

The one PCI-e cable is 18 AWG, so you will not want to run too much power through it. Again, though… not meant for high end gaming rigs, is this.

FSP Twins 500W

There is only one full SATA chain, bearing four connectors. That should do.

FSP Twins 500W

The other peripheral cable has a mix of SATA and Molexes… no Bergs, thank God.

FSP Twins 500W

Finally, here’s the USB motherboard cable. If you need to use the USB-A adapter, pay attention to how you plug it in… it only works one way.

Twins 500W – Cabling
Type of Cable Length from PSU AWG +12V Rail
SATA+SATA+5.25″+5.25″ 460+150+150+150 mm 18 12V1
4+4 pin CPU 600 mm 18
SATA+SATA+SATA+SATA 460+150+150+150 mm 18 12V2
4+4 pin CPU 600 mm 18
24 pin ATX connector 500 mm 18-20 12V3
6+2 pin PCI-e, 6+2 pin PCI-e 460+155 mm 18
USB 2.0 Motherboard 530 mm NA NA
Accessory Cables
Molex to Berg adapter 100 mm
USB 2.0 Motherboard to USB A Plug 205 mm
Unit Dimensions (L x W x H)
Housing: 190 mm x 150 mm x 86 mm
Module: 183 mm x 60 mm x 58 mm

Now, let’s have a look at the status indicators real quick.

FSP Twins 500W

Here, the unit is online and working with one module unplugged and SCREAMING LIKE A BANSHEE. Yes, people, there is an audible warning built into this thing. If there’s a problem, you’re going to know about it. About the only complaint I have about those status indicators is that they don’t flash in sync when the main power is offline. They wink at you in differing intervals, which drives me nuts. Fortunately, these only blink in standby.

And before we continue, yes you can swap a failed module while the other is up and running. That’s one of the main perks of industrial redundant units like this.