EVGA SuperNOVA 750 B2 Power Supply

REVIEW INFORMATION
SUPPLIED BY: EVGA
MANUFACTURER: EVGA
PRODUCT: SuperNOVA 750 B2
PROD LINK: 750 B2 Product Page
PRICE: $89.99 @ NewEgg
Price is at the time of testing!

On we go to the load testing. Since I’m not in my own lab today, we’ll be using all Tazz’ test gear. This includes a SunMoon SM-5500 load tester, a USB Instruments Stingray scope, and a Rek RF9901 power meter. In fact, that’s the same Stingray I was using until the Tektronix showed up at the door.

And yes, we do both use the same power meter. That’s so our results are pretty consistent with each other. The only major difference is, Tazz has the one SM-5500 while I have two SM-268s. He actually gave me the choice back in the day as to whether or not to get the new 5500 and I declined since the two 268s combined can load test larger power supplies.

SuperNOVA 750 B2 – StandBy Tests
Test # +5VSB DC Watts/
AC Watts
Eff. P.F.
Load Tests
1 1.5A 7.6W/
10.1W
75.2% 0.444
5.08V

Tazz does things a bit differently from yours truly, so there is only one standby load test this time. At half power, we find the unit doing pretty well average efficiency. No complaints there and nothing looks out of spec.

SuperNOVA 750 B2 – Cold Load Tests
Test # +3.3V +5V +12V DC Watts/
AC Watts
AC
Input
Eff. P.F. Intake/
Exhaust
Progressive Load Tests
1 1A 1A 5.2A 76.0W/
92.7W
121.3V 82.0% 0.962 23°C/
27°C
3.37V 5.13V 12.24V
2 2.1A 2.1A 10.5A 151.4W/
176.7W
119.6V 85.7% 0.966 24°C/
28°C
3.36V 5.11V 12.22V
3 3.2A 3.2A 15.9A 227.7W/
261.4W
119.2V 87.2% 0.976 24°C/
30°C
3.35V 5.09V 12.20V
4 5.4A 5.4A 26.6A 378.4W/
429.9W
116.8V 88.1% 0.986 25°C/
34°C
3.33V 5.06V 12.16V
5 7.5A 7.5A 37.4A 528.6W/
603.0W
116.1V 87.7% 0.990 27°C/
39°C
3.31V 5.03V 12.12V
6 8.6A 8.6A 42.8A 603.5W/
693.4W
115.5V 87.1% 0.990 27°C/
39°C
3.30V 5.01V 12.12V
7 9.7A 9.7A 48.2A 678.3W/
786.0W
114.5V 86.3% 0.991 28°C/
40°C
3.28V 5.00V 12.10V
8 10.8A 10.8A 53.5A 751.7W/
879.4W
113.5V 85.4% 0.992 29°C/
42°C
3.27V 4.98V 12.08V
Crossload Tests
CL1 14.4A 14.4A 0A 122.6W/
154.9W
119.4V 79.2% 0.964 27°C/
33°C
3.33V 5.02V 12.22V
CL2 0A 0A 61.8A 748.2W/
863.0W
114.6V 86.7% 0.991 28°C/
41°C
3.31V 5.07V 12.08V

With the SM-5500 supporting more than the five presets my 268s do, this table is a bit different as well. From test one to test eight, we’re looking at loads ranging from 10-100%. Tests two, four, and eight are the ones we’ll be using to determine a pass or fail for 80 Plus Bronze.

And what do we find? Well, a clean pass for Silver, that’s what. Awesome… just like the 1600W G2, EVGA has under promised and over delivered again. A guy could really get used to this, though I don’t know if I really like the idea of every unit from a company showing up more efficient than promised. At some point, I have to wonder if it’s a little bit of a disadvantage to the bottom line by leaving some dollars on the table from customers who say, “well, the jonnyGURU review sample did Silver, but what guarantee do I have that mine will? I really wanted Silver, so I’ll just buy one known to do Silver all the time instead.”

On to the voltage regulation. Let me whip out my calculator real quick. Since I personally score this from my own 20-100% load tables, and Tazz has this table extending to the 10% level, I’ll just calculate as I usually do for consistency… on the numbers from test two to eight. Let’s see here… I get 2.7% for the 3.3V rail. That’s a strictly average result. The 5V rail is at the midpoint of average and very good at 2.5%. The 12V, however, is excellent at 1.1%. That gives us an average of 2.1%, or very good. Even if I add in the 10% load numbers, I’d still get a very good result.

So, this is clearly no Leadex platform unit here, but it’s still a pretty good unit. Let’s go to the next page while I spoil Izzy a bit more. Who’s a good dog? Izzy’s a good dog! Yes, she is!